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The Stability Of Russia In 1914

761 words - 3 pages

The Stability of Russia in 1914

In 1914 Russia's stability was questionable; the Tsar's regime had
been under considerable strain due to the unsuccessful uprising in
1905. The Tsar still had the support of the army, which helped to put
down many attempts at revolution. However, there was still brewing
resentments about the harsh conditions of the Tsar's government that
threatened to explode at any time.

The peasantry made up a huge proportion of the population and the
stability of the Russia depended on their compliance. There had been
growing peasant resentments over noble ownership and this resulted in
the peasants trying to overthrow the landowners. The commune were
poorly organised and while they were ok when not under duress but they
were likely to collapse if they were. Although this suggests that the
peasants were unstable force in Russia, other sides of peasant life
were secure such as agriculture. Good farming harvest meant that
people stopped complaining. Also many peasants moved into the urban
areas and this relieved the strain on the land.

As with the peasants, the number of the urban working class strikes
gradually increased, this was because Trade Unions had been shut down
and the urban working class saw revolution as the only way out. As the
became more revolutionary the became more educated and low wages, long
hours and the fact they could not voice their opinions about their
grievances made them seethe with discontent. The dissatisfaction of
the urban working class was definitely an instability however the
power of the strikes were weak and the Tsar, who still had military
support was able to crush them with little difficulty.

The 1905 uprising relied on the support of the educated, liberal
middle-classes in 1914 the liberal was losing support in the Duma
therefore the chance of unrest, rapidly, was minimal. That is not to
say there was not dissent; middle-class were...

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