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The State Of Nature Essay

812 words - 4 pages

In a nation of social media sites and the internet, we are constantly worried about our privacy Access to another person’s personal information is found at the click of a button. It has now become easy for not only strangers but also our own government to spy on us. With news stories like “Wiki Leaks”, many Americans think of the government as big brother watching all. This growing distrust of the government has lead many to wish for a society with no laws and little or no government interference. A world with out rules is a notion that many people argue would be a better choice for Americans today. This idea is the very concept behind “The state of nature”. A Lord of the Fly existence ...view middle of the document...

In the state of nature, there is nothing to stop that other person from taking what you found. This will lead two one of two reactions; either you let them take it from you or you fight to keep it. If you allow them to keep it, eventually the same situation will occur when you find another source of food. In the end your only option is to fight until either one of you backs down or dies. With out rules you will live in a society that is in a constant state of war. I do not believe anyone would want to live in this violent chaotic world.

While the freedom to do whatever you want sounds, amazing in theory in reality it is a terrible way to live. People are not inherently evil so they would not want to live in a violent reality. That is what a society based on the state of nature would lead to. The state of nature is an extreme solution to government interference. So how do we keep our freedom with out resorting to violence and chaos? We create rules we compromise to protect ourselves. This is done by forming a social contract with the people around us. However, a contract is not enough because rules are not followed unless they are enforced. We need to empower one person or a group of people to enforce those laws. In the end,...

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