The Storm Literary Analysis

940 words - 4 pages

Kate Chopin, a well known prolific writer of the late nineteenth century, enlightened readers to empathize with the characters in her literary works. Upon reading and analyzing Chopin’s The Storm, the author uses a rich and profound use of setting to avoid the moral judgments of female sexuality and inner turmoil of each character as a means of providing the reader with an understanding of the suppressive nature of women living in a predominantly male governed society. Chopin illustrates the approaching of the storm as a catalyst between Calixta and Alcee, driving them into their adulterous affair. Ultimately, the retreating of the storm unveils marriage into question.
In essence, Chopin ...view middle of the document...

By contrast, Chopin takes a shift from a male’s objective view of “the storm” to Calixta’s intuitive feeling and connection with “the storm.”
“Calixta, at home, felt no uneasiness for their safety. She sat at a side window sewing furiously on a sewing machine. She was greatly occupied and did not notice the approaching storm. But she felt very warm and often mopped to mop her face on which the preparation gathered in beads. She unfastened her white sacque at the throat. It began to grow dark, and sudden realizing the situation she got up hurriedly and went about closing windows and doors.”
Although Calixta may not be fully aware of the storm yet, she starts having symptoms of perspiration and heat running through her body. As soon that storm approaches, Calixta’s sexual desire is manifested by the level of intensity of the storm itself. Chopin purposely juxtaposes Calixta’s conscious and subconscious mind when she mention that Calixta “felt very warm…unfasten[ing] her white sacque at the throat.” This foreshadows that the storm kindles her emotional and sexual desires even before Alcee’s appearance. Furthermore, it can be interpreted that Calixta may feel suppressed in her marriage with Bobinot.
Moreover, the setting of the storm changes as soon as Alcee makes his appearance at the gate of Calixta’s house. As soon as Calixta steps outside to see him, “the rain drops beg[i]n to fall.” Chopin makes seem as if Alcee coincidently appears as soon as the storm arrives in order to persuade the reader that the storm is responsible for Calixta and Alcee’s sexual encounter. Chopin deliberately describes the intensity of the storm to signify the parallels between the catalytic storm and Calixta and...

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