The Stranger And The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1300 words - 5 pages

Without any credit, the environment leads people to make choices that shape their lives and thoughts. Even though Mark Twain and Albert Camus did not live during the same period, their characters’ decisions for their novels The Stranger and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn were parallel, as were the situations that they went through. Both authors plant their interpretation of their lives into their work and create characters that represent themselves. Meursault and Huck’s choices are a result of multiple factors such as; religion, which is a very influencing subject in all parts of the world and greatly inclined both Camus and Twain in expressing their ideals; relationships, which is a necessity in life and seems to emotionally connect with the authors without interruption; along with the present society’s fallacies left both writers to refute.
Throughout the history of humankind, one main factor that has influenced the world is religion and, as times change, outlook and opinions have varied. Albert Camus writes, “I shall not, as far as I am concerned, try to pass myself off as a Christian in your presence. I share with you the same revulsion from evil. But I do not share your hope, and I continue to struggle against this universe in which children suffer and die.”(Camus, Resistance 70). Camus grew up in a very nonchalant household where religion was not a decree and, consequentially, this greatly affected his faith in God. When Camus was faintly ill with Tuberculosis, his confidence in religion depleted even further and he started to express his opinion through Meursualt (May William F). When Meursault says “He wanted to talk to me about God again, but I went up to him and made one last attempt to explain to him that I had only a little time left and I didn’t want to waste it on God.” (Camus, Stranger 121). Through Meursault, Camus conveys that religion has transformed into a mask for people to hide behind; he illustrates how God’s existence should not be relied upon. Twain replicates this intention in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; he makes a mockery of religion because, even though society is painted one way, there is a completely different angle that it can be interpreted from. The people, Twain describes, are hypocrites. They shun those who commit sins, yet they have all committed the same sinful life. (Gregg Camfield) To interpret the scandals of religion, Twain has Huck analysis the behavior of Miss Watson. When Huck asked for consent to smoke, Miss Watson declared that it was a dirty business and that he should not get involved. “She took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she had done it herself.” (Twain 3). Camus and Twain both understand that the communities they were placed in have deprived themselves from the truth of their ridiculous actions this and by using religion as a way to give name to deeds that otherwise would be questionable.
Relationships appear in many varieties: both positive and negative, but...

Find Another Essay On The Stranger and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay

1060 words - 4 pages There are many opened and closed minded people in the world. In the great novel "The adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Mark Twain shows us that. He shows humans that closed and ignorant lifestyles are destroying society, in such ways as slavery. Twain uses cynicism varietably through the novel by mocking, telling stories, and even in a way curses characters portrayed in the story. He mocks Pap, Tom, and Huck in even some ways. Mark Twain was

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay

888 words - 4 pages Jocelyn Chadwick-Joshua accurately asserts that in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses chapters one through sixteen to establish Huck and Jim as characters and to develop their relationship. To begin, Twain portrays youthful Huck as a remarkably developed, multifaceted character. Huck Finn is very independent, and likes to have control of his own life. Taking matters into his own hands, “I judged I’d hide her good, and then

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1565 words - 6 pages Although in reality and illusion may be mistaken for one another and they both play a large part in the novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” illusion and reality differ in how they impact the minds of characters. Near the beginning of the novel, Huck Finn fakes his own death to protect himself and escape from his father. He later meets the Grangerfords, who are locked in a blood feud with the Shepherdsons. One of their daughters

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

975 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a classic American novel. In the novel, Twain develops the plot into Huck and Jim's adventures allowing them to weave in his criticism of society. The two main characters, Huck and Jim, both run from social injustice and both are distrustful of the civilization around them. Huck is considered an uneducated boy. He is constantly under pressure to adjust to the "humanized" surroundings of society

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1210 words - 5 pages The Devil Becomes the Angel Throughout the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the overarching theme has been civilization vs. individualism. Does a person’s life belong to him, and does he have an inalienable right to live it as he sees fit, or must he sacrifice his values for the group’s “greater good”? Huck Finn, the protagonist, often finds himself clashing with his own morals and the expectations of society. He has thought of turning

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

838 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain’s continuation of Tom Sawyer follows the misadventures of Tom’s friend Huckleberry Finn and a runaway slave, Jim. The story opens with Huck who is living with Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. The sisters are trying to civilize and educate the unwilling Huck who is not happy with his new life of church, school, and manners. Right as Huck is coming to terms with this new

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 1410 words

1410 words - 6 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a classic work in American literature that is used in classrooms everywhere to educate and enlighten students. Twain’s work despite being over two hundred years old is still to this day the premier example of American literature and at the time of its creation served to show the world a new movement in literature into realism and satire and away from the romanticism of the 1800’s. Despite the incredible

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 1450 words

1450 words - 6 pages Huckleberry Finn is a thirteen year old boy living in St Petersburg Missouri with the Widow Douglas and her sister Mrs Watson. He is an immature and uncivilized boy who rejects the teachings of Mrs Watson and Douglas. During this time slavery is not yet abolished so they were accompanied by several slaves. Jim, one of the slaves owned by Mrs Watson, develops an everlasting friendship with Huck. He and Jim go on many of adventures

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

952 words - 4 pages In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, there are many questions that are not answered. Twain keeps Huck and Jim together throughout the novel, for what reason he never says. He keeps the reader in suspense by making Huck and Jim float down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, a slave state, on a raft. Instead of taking the Erie Canal or the Railroads to get to Illinois, Indiana or even Ohio to a free state so Jim can

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1644 words - 7 pages In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses Jim as the moral center of the story to depict the hardships, racial obstacles, and stereotypes that blacks endured during the era of American slavery. Dating back to the 1600’s and during the harsh cruelty of the American slave era comes the inspiring story of a black man in search of a new start. Among many other slaves, Jim is brought to an unjust, nefarious reality as he endures the

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 519 words

519 words - 2 pages Mark Twain used the contrast between the characters of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn to illustrate a romantic and realistic imagination. Tom is spectacularly imaginative in the boyish, romantic sense. Tom has filled his head with romantic adventure novels and ideas; this has shaped Tom's worldview and feeds his fantasies, which he is constantly trying to act out. After reading about gangs and highwaymen, Tom decides to build a gang wishing to rob

Similar Essays

Gender And The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1347 words - 6 pages The world of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is dominated by male figures. Throughout the whole book there are few women characters, and those that do appear often fall into a stereotype. Contrary to Huck’s radical opposition to society’s expectations, women in the novel are all found where they are expected to be: in the home. Men are able to move around more freely and have more clout. Even though Huck’s father is not fit to take care of

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 1358 Words

1358 words - 5 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a book written by Mark Twain in the late 19th Century. It is considered a timeless classic. It tells of a poor white boy running away from brutal parents, and of an intelligent African American man who attempting to escape from bondage and free his family from slavery, and it shows how these two men, Huck and Jim, very different individuals overcome their differences to

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 1107 Words

1107 words - 4 pages From the moment it was first published by Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has caused controversy. It challenged authority, made light of religion, and brought up the issue of slavery and racism. Now, 125 years later, Mark Twain’s story is still making the news. Recently the word “nigger” has been completely removed from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The decision to remove this word is unnecessary because, based on Mark

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay 762 Words

762 words - 3 pages Censorship is a shroud for the intolerable, a withdrawal from the cold truths of humanity, and ultimately, the suppression of expression. When a book such as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is banned in classrooms, students are not only stripped of an enriching work of literature, but also consequently stripped of the cultural and moral awareness required to survive in a world stained with imperfection and strewn with atrocity. To accurately