The Road To Recovery Essay

1662 words - 7 pages

Coming up to a jump about to go airborne but then smash! He crashes into the dirt breaking his leg and part of his knee, but he has no support. This is where you would go to Road 2 Recovery(R2R) for help. There are many foundations out there to help people with sport problems, but there are only a few to help with dirt biking. This is why The Road 2 Recovery foundation is a dedicated program to help AMA professional motocross and supercross members with financial and emotional assistance if they have a career ending or very critical injury (“Welcome to the Road 2 Recovery foundation” 1).
At sometime in every single sport someone is always injured or getting injured. However, of all of the sports, research has proven that motocross is one of the sports with the highest risks. Supercross is the second most dangerous type of dirt biking racing out there. The fast paced racing and the uncertainty of knowing what the racer in front of you will do makes this such a dangerous type of racing. Motocross is little less dangerous because most of the racing is outdoors, not indoors in a small stadium. But the most dangerous type of dirt biking is freestyle. The difficult tricks, speed, and the height of the jumps makes this the most dangerous type of dirt biking. The risk taking behavior is played out in a cat and mouse type games that rides engage in all around the nation. There are many different riders who will do anything to get that extra thrill to get that adrenaline rush. Even some of these riders drive in places that they aren’t suppose to, like non-permitted areas such as closed practice tracks or private land. Some motocross and supercross communities are trying to help riders with the lack of caring about boundaries learn that even though its great to ride, being safe and obeying the law is more important. Most riders take every single risk to just make their lap times better or to hit that jump faster to win. These high speeds combined with rough terrain, and the feeling of not knowing what the rider in front of will do next, makes this sport very dangerous. All of these little and big risks in dirt biking makes this fun but dangerous sport have one of the largest amount of riders injured compared to many other sports (“Motocross = High Risks and Thrill Seekers” 1). High risks, dangerous driving, and the speed of the sport all cause many injuries, some severe and some minor. Every rider at some time gets some type of minor contusions and lacerations, but many of them get worse injuries that cause broken bones that need some type of surgery. Almost every single one of these injuries could be stopped or made less severe by just wearing all or more safety gear (“Motocross Safety” 1). Since the rate of severe and career ending injuries have popped up in motocross. Many different riders are wearing extra safety equipment to help protect themselves from ending their motocross career. “All of these riders take these risks because they are thrill...

Find Another Essay On The Road to Recovery

the road to resilience Essay

960 words - 4 pages The Road to Resilience Have you ever been in a life-changing accident? Have you ever contracted a life-threatening virus? Have you ever experienced something that changed your life forever? Bouncing back from any of these experiences can be very difficult. One has to push forward and use positive thinking to be able to overcome such life-changing experiences. One must build resilience. Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of

The road to independence Essay

1409 words - 6 pages The Road to IndependenceThe Road to Independence was a period of time that the colonies began to gettheir lives together. They began to fight for how they wanted to live. Through the warswith themselves, the French, Indians, and the British was a rough time for the colonies.The fist battle that started to Road to Independence was the French and IndianWar. The British and the American Colonies waged it against the French and their Indianallies

The Road to Independence

1064 words - 4 pages Jenna McMenamin Jenna McMenamin October 30, 2010 Reaction Paper # 2 The Road to Independence This reaction paper is written from the section "The Road to Independence" in the book Documents to Accompany America's History. All of the readings further elaborated on the information we are learning in class. In the paragraphs followed I will go over the main points of each section then summarize my overall feelings

The Road to Success

1812 words - 8 pages . Njoroge’s brother Kamau tells him, “Your learning is for all of us. Father says the same thing. He is anxious that you go on, so you might bring light to our home. Education is the light of Kenya." This passage shows that his learning was essential to his family and to his whole country. His education could “lead to recovery of lost lands” according to his father. His family believed in him to come home with an education and help them recover

The Road to Addiction

851 words - 4 pages people never change about today’s gambling problems, and no change will happen. But with the chance of someone turning down the shaky and uncertain road that leads people down a path full of problems, the life of a gambling victim can be very stressful, full of debt, and truly. People are trying to outlaw the lottery to prevent any more people for losing everything to gambling. Victims of gambling have the same chances we all had to make better and

The Road to Maturity

814 words - 4 pages struggles she and her family undergo when their widowed father, Atticus, a lawyer, takes on the controversial case of Tom Robinson. Through these events, Scout learns many meaningful lessons that lead her on the road to maturity. One of the most meaningful lessons that Scout learns is to not judge one person too easily. Through her encounter with Dolphus Raymond, the town drunk, she realizes that she and other members of the community have

The Road to Hell

917 words - 4 pages apologize to Rennalls if him consider the benefits that the company will get from Rennalls. Works Cited http://www.thomasbunch.com/WPS/Road.htm http://www.writingintime.com/index7556.html?mode=free&category=Case-Studies&item=the-road-to-hell

The road to despair

834 words - 4 pages blinded to the consequences of his scientific experimentation because of his overly obsessive personality. Mary Shelley’s story serves as a cautionary tale warning against the damaging powers of obsession. The search for knowledge, recognition and prosperity can lead one down a very dangerous road and take them away from what really matters in their life. Works Cited Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books, 1981. Print

"The Road to Serfdom"

1208 words - 5 pages The Value of value of human dignity in any society can never be emphasized enough, for this is recognized as a necessary condition for true advancement; and as such, every society must endeavor towards achieving this. We have seen in history how failing to observe this led many devastating outcomes. In his book "The Road to Serfdom," Hayek points out the value of limiting powers of the state, as past events such as the Nazi atrocities occurred

The Road to Success

715 words - 3 pages Success is an event that accomplishes its intended purpose. Success can and does mean different things to different people. Most people agree that accomplishing the goals that they set for themselves is success. Mary’s idea of success is getting a good education, in a profession that interests her, and eventually landing a job in that profession. Mary started on her road to success by doing the best she could do while she was in high school

The road to independence

1207 words - 5 pages The Road To Independence As an individual grows, he or she is molded by the actions of the parents or parental figure that is present in the home. In Henrick Ibsen's play A Doll's House Ibsen created Nora who is a victim of her upbringing and male dominance. What is responsible for Nora's attitude toward life and her acceptance of a commanding mate? Nora has been emotionally controlled her entire life, and she does not know true love. It is only

Similar Essays

The Road To Recovery Essay

1055 words - 5 pages when boys, who were about the same age as her, cut off her hands to make a political statement (Kamara 41). When a person no longer grasps the desire to live, she has hit rock bottom. Kamara, however, with the help from family and others eventually restored her life. She had a long road to recovery, but Beah’s road was even rockier. While Beah went to fight with the army, Mariatu was affected in an emotional way. Obviously there were

Road To Recovery Essay

929 words - 4 pages available, the long road to recovery can be shortened. Something a lot of people don’t realize about depression, or any mental illness for that matter, is that it cannot be cured right away. Many patients have had to fight through trial and error to hang onto the last bit of will they have to get better. During the diagnosis process, patients often have to wait periods as long as a month to get the correct diagnosis, after which they spend

"The Road To Recovery" Process Analysis Research Paper About 'how To Recover From A Traumatic Brain Injury'

1977 words - 8 pages Small StepsJust as no two people are exactly the same; no two traumatic brain injuries can be faithfully identical either. The process of recovery is difficult to predict since each individual's road to recovery is diverse and challenging. However, by staying informed, following an approved multi-step process, and remaining committed to the right rehabilitation team, families can help optimize the condition of their loved one's life. Every year

Different Shades Of Green; Environmental Degradation Under Communism And The Road To Recovery

3226 words - 13 pages When the Iron Curtain finally collapsed in late 1989, many Eastern Europeans welcomed democratic governance with open arms. With redefined policies, a redistribution of power(s), and a shift to hard currency (which would afford Eastern Europe a greater standing on the international market), democracy seemed like a blissful dream; the kind which could afford its people the luxuries which their western counterparts enjoyed. The people, with newly