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The Strict Obedience Of Fundamentalism Essay

683 words - 3 pages

Fundamentalism can be widely defined as the utmost strict obedience towards distinct religious policies and guidelines which is usually understood as a reaction against Modernist Theology. It is also known to be associated with a forceful attack on outside threats to their own religious culture and beliefs. (George M. Marsden. 1980.) Fundamentalism first began as a movement in the United States in the late 19th century, early 20th century. It originally started within American Protestantism as a reaction to theological liberalism and cultural modernism. Soon after it spread to other religions generating quite a large following, including some fallen away Catholics. The term fundamentalism derives a religious affiliation in coherence to a set of very complex beliefs. Fundamentalists argued that many modern theologians had misinterpreted certain doctrines and stressed the infallibility of the bible. They selectively choose what they are against and what they accept in modern culture. What started out as a refined organisation quickly grew and spread throughout the use of media, press and academia. Nowadays there not only exists Protestant Fundamentalists but Islamic Fundamentalists, Buddhist Fundamentalists, Hindu Fundamentalists and many more from various religions and creeds.

To say Religious fundamentalism is always totalitarian may give some false pretenses. The term totalitarianism can be described as a political term in which the state holds complete authority and dictates all aspects of public and private life. Totalitarianism is regulated through the use of forceful political action and propaganda method in organised media. Totalitarianism was first developed in the early 1920s with Italian Fascists. The concept soon spread was later popularized by the opponents of fascist and communist dictatorships. It is argued that a totalitarian state is an official ideology incorporating a vision of the ideal state, belief in which is compulsory (Barbara Goodwin 2007).

Christian Fundamentalism originated from British and American Protestantism in the late 19th century and early 20th century especially among evangelical Christians (Sandeen, Ernest Robert 1970). The originators challenged liberal religion and militantly asserted that the...

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