The Stroop Effect Experiment Essay

1325 words - 5 pages

METHODS
Participants
There were nine participants in this study, five in the first group and four in the second group. The first group included Daina Berry, Justin Quintrell, Paige Govey, Natalie Campbell, and Jared Flannery, while the second group included Megan Powell, Kyle Sugonis, Abigail Mrozek, and Vanessa Landgrave. These participants are undergraduate students from Dr. Kelling’s 11:00AM Experimental Psychology course. The students partook in the study in order to receive a passing grade for the class assignment.
Equipment
This experimental research was conducted in a laboratory setting. The necessary equipment for each group included a stack of twenty squiggle cards, a stack of twenty word cards, and a stopwatch. On the back of each card, the correct color was written to allow for swift and accurate scoring. In order to record the results, each individual participant also needed a sheet of paper and a pencil or ballpoint pen.
Procedure
The famous Stroop Task, a within subjects design, was replicated on Tuesday, April 12, 2011 in classroom 303 within Harris Hall on the Marshall University campus in Huntington, West Virginia.
Due to a failure in communication, the two groups followed slightly different procedures. However, in both groups, participants were asked to name the color of the card presented to them.
The first group. To begin, the group members determined which students would hold additional roles. Paige Govey was given the role of “timer,” and Daina Berry was given the role of “flipper.” Justin
Quintrell accepted these responsibilities when necessary (when Paige or Daina was the participant).
Participant order was chosen by the flipper. Then the repeatable part of the procedure began.
The first participant was announced. On the timer’s command, the flipper pulled a Squiggle Card so that it was facing the participant. After the participant said the color, the flipper quickly positioned that card in one of two piles on the desk, thus revealing another card to the participant. One pile held correct responses; the other pile contained incorrect responses. This routine continued until the last color was identified. At that time, the timer stopped the stopwatch and announced the time. Each participant then recorded this data. This small procedure was then repeated using the Word Cards.
When the first participant had identified the colors of both the Squiggles Cards and the Word Cards, the flipper shuffled each deck. The second participant was announced, and the cycle continued.
This process was repeated until each participant had a turn with the cards. This completed Trial One. Trial Two was conducted exactly the same way as Trial One: Squiggle Cards and then Word Cards.
The second group. To begin, the group members determined that students would exchange roles. When Megan Powell was the participant, Abigail flipped and Kyle timed. When Abigail Mrozek was the participant, Megan flipped and Kyle timed. When Kyle...

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