The Struggle Towards A Democratic Nation

2647 words - 11 pages

The Struggle Towards a Democratic Nation

Education Position Paper

The Struggle Towards a Democratic Nation

Imperialism of one sort or another has been occurring for centuries around the world. In the U.S. a specific form of imperialism is in full effect but is less noticeable than the normative physical imperialism. Linguistic imperialism occurs when a dominant group imposes their language on another, and within the United States this imperialism has been occurring through English. English is the language set up by the American society to be the dominant official language. America is supposed to be the melting pot of different languages and cultures but there is a specific connection between English speakers and dominance over non-English speakers. From this relationship a hierarchy develops in which those who are the representative English speaker in America (Caucasian), are more privileged and more recognized in society than non-English speakers normally of color. Bilingual Education brings this topic to light because it is a governmental supported idea that basically forces non-English speakers to learn English. As children grow out of bilingual education they seem to have two choices; move away from their own culture and assimilate, or retain their culture but don‘t be recognized by society. Of course these choices aren’t always so clear-cut and often the results are varied, but a conflict remains. This topic is explored in Americo Parede’s novel George Washington Gomez, when the question is raised, is it possible for a non-white non-English speaking person to become educated in America without losing their ethnic identity. The main character in this book Gualinto explores what it means to be Mexican-American and what that term means to him after being educated. Also my own experiences of the effects of linguistic imperialism and bilingual education in the California school system have lent to this paper. Ultimately all this information asks the question: Does the dominant white power structure and bilingual education in the U.S. allow non-English speakers, normally of color, to retain their cultural identity?

The migration of the English to America and the eventual formation of the colonies led to the construction of whiteness as an ideology of privilege and dominance. Literature from this period shows how whiteness became the representative skin color of the new Americas and subsequently how the new nation embraced this ideology. This developing country was a very conducive stage for literature of all genres to shape and influence the population, because people like the Puritans felt they needed to show distinctly how they were separate from others in order to define themselves. This soon led the white population “.... to justify the exclusion from full participation in their sanctioned community those who were not like them, whether because of religious, national, or racial differences” (Babb 58). Early writers like...

Find Another Essay On The Struggle Towards a Democratic Nation

The teacher in a developing democratic society

2482 words - 10 pages going to argue the challenges in the 21st century and their impact on both education system and teachers. And also I am going to look at the teacher in the developing democratic country and the teaching strategies a teacher should develop in order to sensitise learners towards freedom. My arguments will be in support of underlying ideas of philosophers on the basis of what education should achieve.Challenges to society in the 21st CenturyUnemployment

The Strategic Importance of a Democratic Burma

652 words - 3 pages of Burma. Background Information The first inhabitants of the Ayayarwady River basin were the Mon and Pyu civilizations (ProQuest, 2009). In the 11th century, these civilizations led to a unified Burmese kingdom at Bagan. Great Britain incorporated Burma into India in 1885, which led to it becoming a separate colony in 1937. During World War II Japan occupied Burma until 1945. After the war, Burma became an independent nation in 1948. General

The Defining of a Nation

908 words - 4 pages its vast lands. From the beginning of America's young history, immigrants fleeing persecution, famine, tyranny, or looking for a fresh start at a new life flocked to the shores of this nation. Even today, thousands of immigrants pour into the land of freedom and opportunity so that they might have a better life that the one they left behind. The struggle for immigrants yesterday and today was and will never be an easy one. It is, instead, a long

The Shaping Of A Nation

1154 words - 5 pages and independence was adopted with twelve votes. The Committee of Five appointed to draft the Declaration of Independence, including John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Robert Livingston, and Roger Sherman, produced a finished product and, on July 4, 1776, sent it to the printers. The adoption of a Declaration Of Independence was the start of a long, hard road towards separation from Britain. The end of the road would be reached with

A Father of the Nation

1444 words - 6 pages be stopped where it was, but it was not his ultimate goal to remove it from the nation. He needed the support of all in the Republican Party to gain candidacy, and calling for a full scale removal of slavery was not the route to go. Later on his speech continued to beg for the unification of the nation. He asked that the Northerners to not submit to the demands of the South, at the same time he asked the Southerners to realize that they were

Exploring the Ways Propaganda Was Used to Mobilise the Minds of the Nation Towards War

3559 words - 14 pages Exploring the Ways Propaganda Was Used to Mobilise the Minds of the Nation Towards War Propaganda is a specific type of message presentation aimed to manipulate the opinions of individuals into a particular point of view, rather than to merely communicate the facts about something. At its root, the denotation of propaganda is to propagate, actively spread, a philosophy or viewpoint. Advertising, religious preaching

The Hindutva Movement: A Struggle Towards a “Hindu Secular India”

1061 words - 4 pages "We must look after the Muslims and treat them as part of us." This seems like a pleasant statement from Mr. Bal Thackeray, the leader of the Shiv Sena party and a proponent of the Hindutva movement, but it hardly works to conceal the villainous face of the Hindu nationalistic movement he follows. This movement aims to protect the interests of India by enhancing cohesion not only within the Hindu classes but also with other religious communities

A Step Towards Democracy: The Jacksonain Era

1023 words - 5 pages The years between 1825 through 1850 were filled with reforms ranging from political reforms to religious reforms. This era is commonly known as the Jacksonian Era. Prior to the Jacksonian Era, the early 19th century was classified to be a period of extreme instability. The Jacksonian Era involved many new ideas such as King Mob, the spoils system, expansion towards the West, and the Bank War. These characteristics of the Jacksonian Era brought

The Kite Runner: A Journey Towards Atonement

2295 words - 9 pages effectiveness of Amir’s attempts to achieve atonement. During the beginning of the novel, Baba is represented as an impeccable man, one who is honorable and strong. Amir, in contrast, was seen as weak and vulnerable; he spent the majority of his life trying to live up to Baba’s impossible expectations. However, towards the end of the novel, there is a role reversal between Amir and his father. Upon the discovery of his sins towards Ali and Hassan

Women's Writing: A Struggle Through the Ages

2193 words - 9 pages which they wish to become a part. However, the progression of Canadian women's writers throughout history is now highly evident within society. Lastly, it can be deduced that Canadian women's writers have finally succeeded in their struggle to find a voice in society and that they no longer face the same degree of oppression they were met with in the not so distant past. Truly, women writers have been able to overcome the obstacles facing them in

A Struggle to Accomplish the Unattainable

1330 words - 5 pages Freakonomics. The leader of this branch of the Black Gangster Disciple Nation was J.T. He was a man who was very intelligent. He actually attended college and graduated with a degree in business. This in turn lead to how he controlled his gang, “He knew the importance of collecting data and finding new markets; he was always on the lookout for better management strategies. It was no coincidence, in other words, that J.T. was the leader of this crack

Similar Essays

Myanmar Political Crisis: Towards A Democratic Nation

2308 words - 9 pages triggered global interest in determining whether Myanmar has able to transform towards achieving a democratic nation. However, the election was regarded not free and fair. Since the election, the public security is not in place. Riots are happening in all over the country. The situation in Myanmar has worsened after the election. It has claimed lots of lives and also has caused injuries to many people as well damage public infrastructure

The Struggle To Become A Nation

1123 words - 4 pages In this essay, I am going to analyze the process of creating a nation in Cuba, Brazil and Mexico respectively. I am going to give a profound examination of Latin American’s struggle to become a nation. Moreover, this paper will compare and contrast critical topics such as the abolition of slavery in Brazil, racial issues and war in Cuba and social revolution in Mexico. The main similarities between the abolition of slavery in Brazil, racial

Eamon De Valera's Struggle For A Sovereign Nation

2966 words - 12 pages Eamon de Valera's Struggle for a Sovereign Nation "Sinn-ne Fianna Fail", the first line of the Irish National Anthem loosely translates "soldiers are we/whose lives are pledged to Ireland" , served as Eamon de Valera's focus throughout his life. Born on October 14th, 1882 in New York City's New York Nursery and Child's Hospital to Catherine (Kate) Coll and Vivion Juan de Valera of 61 East 41st Street, Manhattan. Eamon's mother Kate

The Teacher In A Developing Democratic Society

2482 words - 10 pages going to argue the challenges in the 21st century and their impact on both education system and teachers. And also I am going to look at the teacher in the developing democratic country and the teaching strategies a teacher should develop in order to sensitise learners towards freedom. My arguments will be in support of underlying ideas of philosophers on the basis of what education should achieve.Challenges to society in the 21st CenturyUnemployment