The Study Of Postcolonial Feminist Mahasweta Devi

1439 words - 6 pages

The study of contemporary Postcolonial feminist Mahasweta Devi’s Short Stories “Drupadi, Breast-giver, Behind the Bodice” utters the viewpoint of class and gender clearly. It underlines the fact that the society in which Mahasweta works seems to be starkly divided into two classes- the rich and privileged, and the not are unprivileged. The woman emerges to be a class of low standard has been dominated and doesn’t seem to have attained her freedom even in independent countries. Her sufferings are often under-looked and eventually she merges into the latter class which never asserting her rights and dignity.
Class conflicts have always been there in history. In fact, neither cast or class but the economical status is all that matter for a person to uphold. A person is judged by spending capacity or the position he or she holds. Mahasweta Devi focus remains in the socio-economic aspects that divide the society on the aspects of disability. Here the term disable particular about the economical disability of the person who’s strategically remains low. She imposed the class struggle in her Breast trilogy in all the ways. Her protagonist “Gangor, Drupadi, Jashoda” are all holding with different distinguished circumstance but the constant tussle which moves on their life with the ultimate oppression is due to class struggle.
Furthermore she addresses the gender questions and the differences seen between the sexes through socio-economic relation which ultimately influence to oppress female identity of Third World indigenous women. The particularity of dominating Subaltern women by men asserting illiterate, it was clearly stated that Mahasweta Devi’s portrayal of women who underwent supressment are not literate. Here, she protests the idea of women who seems to be a ladder in man’s society.
Mahaswrta Devi’s Breast trilogy “Breast-giver, Drupadi, Behind the Bodice” powerfully comments on the capacity for the individual to overcome the boundaries established by the system of class and gender dominant assumptions and expectations may essentially present a person from becoming socially mobile within a seemingly rigid hierarchical social structure. However the protagonist language use as a tool which enables to confined the lower class strategy within society. The transformation of the protagonist Gangor on way to prostitution is witness that the dehumanisazation through the socialization process made them to be victimization. Issues of both the class and gender are performed from her short stories that ambiance from so called sociality.
Gender and class expectation in Third World are based around a fixed social structure. Here the women who lived in the shadow of men and they were disempowered. The fixed class system reluctant in allowing the lower class to empower by their own. Hence the fixed streams of truthful representation of social structure of the people who in third world are oppressed and degenerated are practical expressed through...

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