This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Success Of The First Two Labour Governments Was Outweighed By The Failures In Britain

2320 words - 9 pages

The Success of the First Two Labour Governments was Outweighed by the
Failures in Britain

The success of Labour's governments during its two terms in power, in
the 1920's easily outweighed its failures and shortcomings, in
Britain. This was a Labour government that introduced the idea of free
mass secondary education, built over half a million houses, and
through Labour established Britain as a major player in European and
World politics. The Labour government were in power at the time of the
Great Depression, and their failure to address the serious economic
crisis bought about as a result of an economic downturn, following the
short boom after the war, may be seen as a severe weakness in the
second government. However, these flaws may be seen as a small aspect
of the overall policy of the Labour government, and cannot out-way the
long-term success of their social and political policy plans.

When Labour first came in to power in 1924 they introduced many new
policies, which were definite achievements, one such example, would be
'John Wheatley's Housing Act', which provided £9 million p.a. for
local councils to build new homes. By 1933 well over 500,000 houses
had been built, providing much needed shelter and accommodation for
the poor and homeless. Some other imported achievement by the Labour
government, were the rising of pensions and unemployment benefit. In
addition the gap between the 2, 16-week periods of unemployment
benefit was abolished. This meant that the unemployed could stay of
work for up to 32 weeks consecutively in a single year, giving them a
much needed income. However, many still felt that the number of 32
weeks should be increased, as there were still 20 weeks when no income
would be coming in, leaving the vulnerable homeless, even more
vulnerable.

In this first government, there were many educational reforms, such as
the reintroduction of state scholarships for university students.
Also, in 1926, the Education Minister C.P Trevalyan appointed
commissions to review the education system. These commissions, known
as the 'Hadow Report' introduced a separation in the schools'
structure. Children over the age of 11 were to study in the new
'secondary' school, and this established the principle of free
secondary education for all, meaning that not only the wealthy had
access to secondary education.

These policies were directed at improving the living conditions of the
poor. The new government showed that Britain needed to leave its
Victorian attitudes behind and work towards improving standards of
living for the lowest social classes.

The foreign policies of the Labour government achieved success, even
though most of these ultimately proved unnecessary and irrelevant in
the long term. The most successful policy for the first Labour
government was...

Find Another Essay On The Success of the First Two Labour Governments was Outweighed by the Failures in Britain

What Caused the First Crusade, and was it a Success?

1346 words - 5 pages temple. The main idea of the First Crusade was good against evil, in which the crusaders were on the good side and the Muslims and Jews on the evil side; after all they were the one who killed Jesus. The two main leaders that called for the First Crusade were Alexius I, emperor of the Byzantine Empire, and Pope Urban II. The First Crusade was an evil act against Muslims and Jews.Greed and lack of knowledge mostly caused the First Crusade. The

To what extent was the granting of the right to vote to women, in Britain, due to their role in the First World War?

817 words - 3 pages Government that it was possible to allow women the vote while still maintaining its position in world affairs.This had an effect in the enfranchisement but it did not contribute to the same degree as the role of women during the First World War While men across the country volunteered an were leaving for mainland Europe, the gap left in the British workforce had to be filled by the remaining population which was the women, who had previously been

Labour Party in Britain in the Years 1924-31

3095 words - 12 pages Labour Party in Britain in the Years 1924-31 Historians have debated just how competent the two Labour administrations were between 1924 and 1931. Governments are normally only considered “competent” if they have managed the economy efficiently, prevented widespread corruption and maintained law and order. Labour came to power at the end of 1923, a time when the Conservatives and other right-wing groups were spreading

Economic Waves- The Evolution of our Governments triumphs and failures through the Interaction with the Economy

3272 words - 14 pages company despite what the critics say (2). While all these monopolies throughout the history of America, another element has helped develop the way in which the government and the economy fit together. The Keynesian economics system and Reaganomics are two economic approaches that two of the presidents in the 20th century attempted to put into action. The first, Keynesian economics, was an approach initiated by Franklin D. Roosevelt when

The Failures of Violence

1539 words - 6 pages can it work?” “Why can't armed and powerful opponents simply kill everyone that doesn't agree with them?” The answer couldn't be simpler: because the people will revolt. A few thousand oppressors wielding violence simply cannot control several million determined people. This lack of control is illustrated by four events throughout this chapter. First, let's take a look at an example of nonviolence at work. In March 1917, nearly 200,000

The Failures of Prohibition

619 words - 3 pages ways to drink. People always find a way to get what they want. If you tell someone not to do something, it is only going to make them want to do it more. “Absence makes the heart grow fonder.” Enforcing prohibition was a failure because not only did it do the complete opposite of what the government thought it would do, but it completely backfired. “They did not realize that the law would be resented and resisted by sizeable elements in an

Use of Imagery in the First Two Acts of Macbeth

1880 words - 8 pages in “nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark”. The image of darkness as a blanket masking the evil is often present throughout the first two acts. “Nor heaven peep” implies the sinful nature of what will be done, as heaven is forced to stay out of it. This suggests supernatural or demonic powers interfering in the actions, creating tension and unease within the audience. Darkness is also seen in the weather, creating pathetic fallacy

The Importance of the Battle of Britain In World War Two

2358 words - 9 pages The Importance of the Battle of Britain In World War Two In this essay I will explain why I think The Battle of Britain was the most important turning point in World War Two. I think this because although there was many turning points that were important to the direction the war took, The Battle of Britain showed for the first time that Hitler and the Nazis could be defeated and if Germany had won the battle, Britain

The First World War and Women's Suffrage in Britain

1733 words - 7 pages what extent did the First World War lead to the accomplishment of the women’s suffrage movement of Britain in 1928? Two of the sources used in the essay, The Women’s Suffrage: a short history of a great Movement by Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and The cause: a short history of the women's movement in Great Britain By Ray Strachey, are evaluated for their origin, purpose, value and limitations. This investigation will consider the role of women

The Consumption of Alcohol by Young People in Britain

1567 words - 6 pages This assignment has been developed to discuss the consumption of alcohol in young people in Britain, and to suggest possible solutions for the young people of today and to also carry onto the next generation. I will also research why young people feel the need to drink and what attracts them to alcohol, also this assignment will look into who is more susceptible to drinking alcohol, this could be male or female also the health risks to heavy or

The league of nations was a success

551 words - 2 pages The League of Nations managed to keep a lot of items going and introduced co-operation between countries in the 1920'sIn my opinion the League of Nations was a success I will discuss my reasons in this essay.The aims of the League of Nations were to discourage aggression, to encourage co-operation, disarmament and to improve working conditions for everyone in the world.The League of Nations was set up because after the First World War everyone

Similar Essays

The First Labour Government Of Great Britain

5210 words - 21 pages habits of the person to whom it was applied were not approved.I may begin right away, then, by saying that the difference between cheese and chalk is not greater than the difference between the first Labour Government of Great Britain and the Bolshevik Government of Russia. I will give you here just two or three points of difference, for I expect to deal more full with the subject at tonight's meeting. In the first place, the Labour Government was

The Labour Governments Of 1924 And 1929 31 Demonstrated That The Labour Party Was Fit To Govern

1207 words - 5 pages plan, in which the US would lend money to Germany, so they could restart their economy. This may have ultimately led to the General strike in Britain, but at the time, the Dawes plan was deemed a success. The other major success of the first Labour government was negotiating trade with Russia, by giving the Communist regime, full international recognition. The second Labour government, with Arthur Henderson as its

Why Was Britain The First Nation To Industrialise?

1810 words - 7 pages not only change Britain, but the entire world was revolutionised by their inventions. In their historical developments they were also efficient in their transfer of knowledge to future generations who continued in their quests for a more mechanised and labour-saving world.Transport as a defining factor in the British industrial revolution is also very important, relative too to the location of the nation, the transport situation of Britain made

Why Was Britain The First Nation To Industrialise?

1810 words - 7 pages not only change Britain, but the entire world was revolutionised by their inventions. In their historical developments they were also efficient in their transfer of knowledge to future generations who continued in their quests for a more mechanised and labour-saving world.Transport as a defining factor in the British industrial revolution is also very important, relative too to the location of the nation, the transport situation of Britain made