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The Suffering Of The Jews In World War Ii According To The Book Night By Elie Wiesel

783 words - 3 pages

Night is a remarkable document because it shows how much people can endure. It states the obvious to draw attention to the text's treatment of the Holocaust, but this is perhaps its greatest claim to our attention. There are countless books, articles, films and documentaries on the subject, but few are written by people who have suffered directly in such a way, and even fewer are animated by such terrible pain and understanding of what was lost. Discussion of Night must begin and end with what the Nazis did to the Jews.Jews faced many problems within the Holocaust. Their identity was taken away from them and they were given numbers, 'In the afternoon we were made to line up. Three prisoners brought a table and some medical instruments. With the left sleeve rolled up, each person passed in front of the table. The three 'veterans,' with needles in their hands, engraved a number on our arms. I became A-7713. After that I had no other name.' Yet they could do nothing. Losing your identity and being put in a place of demeanor like that is self-detrimental. Loaded into a wagon of 80 only built for a few, and being told if anyone was to show up missing, all of the people would be killed like "dogs". 'There are eighty of you in this wagon, added the German officer. If anyone is missing, you'll all be shot, like dogs...' Comparing a human being to an animal is outlandish. While riding from camp to camp seeing the crematory's flames bursting from the top of the buildings in the night skies, to moving multiple tons of stone during the day, they could only hope that they were not the next to be put in the flames. 'As the train stopped, we saw this time that flames were gushing out of a tall chimney into the black sky.'It is worth nothing that their sufferings ran the gamut from trivial harassment to mass murder. The degradation began slowly with small changes and gathered momentum as time passed. It started with yellow stars and curfews, continued with confinement in the synagogue with no toilet facilities and waiting in the hot sun, then escalated as they were herded into sealed cattle wagons. This progression reduced them from citizens of a town to creatures treated worse...

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