This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Supreme Court Essay

1106 words - 4 pages

The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court has had many different places where it was located over the years. There has been a struggle to find a permanent home for the most powerful court of law. At first, the meetings were in the Merchant Exchange Building in New York City. The court then followed the nation's capitol to Philadelphia in 1790. In 1800 the court again relocated to Washington DC. At first they spent their time meeting in various places. The place to find the Supreme Court now is in Washington DC, on First Street located in Northeast.
The Supreme court was created during the Constitutional Convention of 1787 during which the delegates discussed the necessity of a Supreme Court. The two major reasons for the need of this type of court was going to be to settle the conflicts that may arise between states, and the fact that there would be a court that would have to maintain the uniformity of the federal law. Article III vested the judicial power in "one Supreme Court" , and such inferior courts as the Congress may form from time to time…"
The Supreme Court of the United States has several different types of cases which they generally hear. The first of these are controversies in which the United States is a party. Another categories of cases are ones in which there is a conflict between different states, as well as cases in which the parties involved are from different states. The federal question jurisdiction includes cases that are under the Constitution or federal statutes and or treaties. Cases that involve admiralty and maritime law are also heard by the Supreme Court. This court is considered to be the final arbitrator between the assertion of power and the restrictions on power derived from a written constitution. The Supreme Court also has appellate jurisdiction, which means the cases that are appealed from a lower court with an issue that concerns with the federal law or the Constitution.
Not all cases get heard by the Supreme Court. A case can either go through the federal or the state court system, the case comes to the Supreme Court. There are four different ways to reach the Supreme Court. It can be through a petition for an extraordinary writ. There is also a request for certification. A case can also be heard through an appeal, or a petition for a writ of certiorari.
The Supreme Court has nine judges, which serve. These judges assess cases. These Justices hold their terms for life, "during good behavior" under Article III. The current Supreme Court Justices are Justice John Paul Stevens, appointed by Gerald Ford in 1975. Ronald Regan appointed Justice Sandra Day O'Conner to her term in 1981. Justice Antonia Scalia was appointed by Ronald Regan in 1986. Another Justice appointed by Ronald Regan is Anthony Kennedy in 1988. George Bush appointed Justice David Souter in 1990. Justice Clarence Thomas was appointed by George Bush in 1991. Bill Clinton appointed Justice Ruth Bader...

Find Another Essay On The Supreme Court

Path to the Supreme Court Essay

1145 words - 5 pages Article III of the Constitution of the United States vests judicial power in “one supreme Court”. With incredible adaptability, the Constitution has stood the test of time. Largely due to the limited specificity as to the application of its words, the Constitution has allowed the character of the Court to be historically defined by the individuals who have held the position of “Chief Justice of the United States”. The ideology and individual

The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court

1455 words - 6 pages The Brethren – Inside the Supreme Court: Book Review The Brethren, co-authored by Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong, is an in-depth documentary of the United States Supreme Court from 1969 to 1975, under the leadership of Warren Burger. The book attempts to present the reader with what "really" goes on in the Supreme Court. It describes the conferences, the personality of justices, and how justice's feel toward each other, items which are

John Marshall and the Supreme Court

843 words - 3 pages Chief Justice John Marshall made the Supreme Court what it is today with the help of the case of Marbury vs. Madison. He wrote the decision for "the most monumental case ever decided by any court in any country" (Glennon). Judicial review, and Chief Justice John Marshall, earned the Supreme Court the respect and prestige it carries today. Marshall had several qualities that gave him the power and respect to succeed in making a

Judicial Process of the Supreme Court

1167 words - 5 pages Nature’s Judicial Process in the Supreme Court consists of decision-making; based on the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. Although the Supreme Court has the capability to decide all extended cases; it also has the power to ascend under the Constitution, which allows the Supreme Court its jurisdiction in the Judicial Branch of government. The Judicial Process interpret the laws that are established in the Supreme Court; thus, allowing the

The Supreme Court and Personal Civil Rights

1224 words - 5 pages I. "Our constitution is colorblind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law.” – Justice John Harlan, in his dissenting opinion in the case Plessy v. Ferguson. (History of Brown v. Board of Education) The US Supreme Court has evolved to promote new personal civil rights for African-Americans, ultimately creating a more racially equal society. II. The first way that

The Supreme Court in American Politics

1386 words - 6 pages The Supreme Court, also known as the court of last resort or the court of appeals, is the highest judicial body within the American court system. It consists of nine Supreme Court Justices that are appointed by the President of the United States. Their decisions are based solely on constitutional matters. Their rulings are not subject to further review by any other court and cannot be appealed against. The Supreme Court sees over federal

The Supreme Court Opinions of Clarence Thomas

1805 words - 7 pages The Supreme Court has embraced its objective to assist the government in its framework and structuring through law as well as the interpretation of the law. However, plenty of their work has remained a mystery to the general public. Jeffrey Toobin enlightened the audience in The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court; however, most curious to me was the manner in which Jeffrey Toobin speculates that Justice Thomas, a Justice he has

The Supreme Court and Civil Rights

1147 words - 5 pages . “Rights were eventually applied against actions of the state governments in a series of cases decide by the Supreme Court,” Dawood stated. In previous years (1790-1803), the Supreme Court had little say in decisions being made by government. As time went on the Supreme Court took on more responsibility and started making additional decisions, which in time helped minorities gain their civil rights. It took a couple of years, as a matter of fact

Supreme Court Rulings During The Antebellum Period

723 words - 3 pages The antebellum period was filled with important Supreme Court rulings that had an influential impact on the U.S. The case of Dred Scott vs. Sandford is a perfect example of a ruling that highly affected the U.S. In Dred Scott vs. Sandford the Supreme Court ruled that African Americans, whether a slave or free, were not American citizens and were unable to sue in federal court. The Court also ruled that Congress did not have the power to ban

Does The Supreme Court Abuse Its Power?

2173 words - 9 pages Does The Supreme Court Abuse Its Power? There have been many complaints and theories of how the Supreme Court has a tendency to act as a "supra-legislature" (Woll 153). It is proposed that the Supreme Court takes the power to make laws and set policies which rightfully belongs to the Congress and state legislatures. They state that Justices exceed their authorized powers of judicial review and read their own opinions and

Important Cases Of The Us Supreme Court

731 words - 3 pages Important Cases of the US Supreme Court The United States Supreme Court has interpreted the constitutional guarantees contained in amendments to the constitution. Among these Guaranteed rights are the freedoms of religion, speech, and press, along with the right of protection against illegal search and seizure, equal protection under the law, and the right to counsel. These rights all contained in the first amendment to the constitution are

Similar Essays

The Supreme Court Essay

1067 words - 4 pages In 1787 Article three of the constitution created the Supreme Court, but not until 1789 was it configured. The way it was originally set up was with one Chief Justice and five associate judges, with all six members being appointed for life. This court serves as the “supreme law of the land”, it has the power to determine if state or federal laws are in conflict with how the Court interprets the constitution.      Presently the supreme

The Political Supreme Court Essay

587 words - 2 pages The Political Supreme Court      It is nearly impossible to avoid politics during the appointments of high profile positions; therefore, the idea that Supreme Court is above politics when referring to its appointments is giving to much credit to that entity. The appointments of the Supreme Court, as with any political body, correlate no only to the media's portraying, but also to interest group the President wishes to

The United States Supreme Court Essay

670 words - 3 pages The laws of the United States of America are governed by the Constitution which is broken down into three main branches. These branches are the Legislative Branch, Executive Branch and the Judicial Branch. The Judicial Branch of the government is made up of the Supreme Court, Circuit court of Appeals, Specialized Courts and District Court. Congress passes laws, the President either passes or vetoes these laws, but the Supreme Court decides if

The United States Supreme Court Essay

1975 words - 8 pages THE UNITED STATESSUPREMECOURTI've chosen to research on the Supreme Court and it's Justices. This seemed like an interesting topic to me, because someday I want to be a part of the legal system.The Supreme Court of the United States, composed of a chief justice and eight associate justices, is at the apex of the U.S. judicial system. Provisions for the making of the Supreme Court were made in Article III of the U.S. Constitution. In addition to