This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Story Of Pecola Breedlove In The Bluest Eyes By Toni Morrison

1322 words - 5 pages

The Story of Pecola Breedlove in The Bluest Eyes by Toni Morrison


The story of Pecola Breedlove in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison is very dramatic. Like a seed planted in bad soil and in a hostile condition, Pecola, a very young and innocent African American girl, does not have a chance to grow up normally like her peers. Her parents' personal history is shown to have played out in extreme measures in her life. Her father, abandoned since childhood, does not have a sense of fatherhood. Her mother is a product of hatred and ignorance. The Breedlove's all are confronted by prejudice on a daily basis, both classism and racism, and for the first time, the white standard of beauty. Growing up in this environment, Pecola is vulnerable in every way and becomes the victim of discrimination by both white and black people in her community.
Inherited from her mother the feelings of rejection, Pecola is a vulnerable girl. The novel indicates that her mother, from the early part of her life, felt a sense of separateness and unworthiness and that she "never felt at home anywhere, or that she belonged anyplace" (111). Consequently, from Pecola's birth, her mother placed upon Pecola the same shroud of shame, weakness, and inadequacy. The circumstances surrounding Pecola's first period are consistent with the vulnerability of her position. Pecola is not even with her own mother when it happens. There is a real sense that Pecola cannot participate in traditions, or receive wisdom from previous generations, because her family life is so unhealthy. When her own body begins to change, she can only fear it. Her mother has not taken care to prepare her for those changes, in sharp contrast to Mrs. MacTeer, who has fully prepared Frieda. Family tradition being cut off from these vital connections to family and lineage results in Pecola's becoming alienated from her own body, as she is terrified, shrieks and cries at the sight of her own menstrual blood.
Pecola's vulnerability can also be seen through her interaction with other children. She is so weak and inferior that she is always the target of other children's harassment. When a group of black boys pick on her blackness and her naked father, she cannot stand up for herself. All she can do is "edging around the circle [of those black guys] crying" (66). Or "when one of the girls at school [wants] to be particularly insulting [to] a boy or wants to get an immediate response from him, she [would] say 'Bobby loves Pecola Breedlove!' and never fails to get peals of laughter from those in earshot, and mock anger from the accused" (46). Obviously these boys and girls feel they are superior to Pecola in every way. None of them want to put himself/herself in Pecola's position. Being Pecola means being exposed to all sorts of humiliation, and unable to defend herself.
At home Pecola is the victim of domestic abuse. The fight with Maureen Peal reveals something important: Pecola's desperate...

Find Another Essay On The Story of Pecola Breedlove in The Bluest Eyes by Toni Morrison

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

1194 words - 5 pages The Bluest Eye There are many themes that seem to run throughout this story. Each theme and conflict seems to always involve the character of Pecola Breedlove. There is the theme of finding an identity. There is also the theme of Pecola as a victim. Of all the characters in the story we can definitely sympathize with Pecola because of the many harsh circumstances she has had to go through in her lifetime. Perhaps her rape was the most

Personal Appearance in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

945 words - 4 pages My report is on a wonderful story called 'The Bluest Eye' written by Toni Morrison and published by the Penguin Group. This book was originally published in 1970. 'The Bluest Eye' was Toni Morrison's first novel that takes place in the 1940's and is set in the author's girlhood hometown of Lorain, Ohio. This story is about a young girl named Pecola Breedlove who is about 11 years old and would give anything to have the bluest eyes. "Pecola is

"The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison - Analysis

1598 words - 6 pages and every toy doll that has blue eyes and blonde hair. She is puzzled by why everyone believes that blue eyed and blonde haired toy dolls are beautiful. The story continues on describing how ugly the Breedlove family were thought to be and their home which is a storefront. Pecola's parents always fight because of her fathers drunkenness and her mother's trying to seem self-righteous. As her parents fight, Pecola feels sick and unhappy; she

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

2058 words - 9 pages Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye tells the story of Pecola Breedlove, a young girl living in Lorain, Ohio, who has to face harsh conditions from a young age. Pecola’s family has a reputation of “ugliness”, a reputation that their town despises them for. Pecola herself believes the allegations that she is ugly to be true, not only because of the constant abuse that she witnesses in her own family, but also because she has been told that she is ugly

"The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison - the perception of "beauty"

1045 words - 4 pages what it is, dysfunctional.Whiteness is the standard of beauty, according to the characters in "The Bluest Eye", as they all get influenced by others, such as Sherly Temple, and her school friends like Maureen Peal. Pecola, Ms. Breedloves daughters image of beauty is Shirley Temple. White, blonde, tall, and blue eyes, the perception given to her, and unless she achieves these things, she will not be beautiful. Ms. Breedlove also has a perception of

Review of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

1440 words - 6 pages Review of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Love is an amazing emotion. A life without love is a life not worth living. As a child, one has thirsts for love and approval that can only be quenched by influential adults and peers. If love is not given during childhood, it will forever taint the individual's life. Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye magnificently captures the mind of mature readers and both genders in its

Analysis of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

2180 words - 9 pages In the novel, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison readers are taken throughout the daily lives of African Americans who are faced with numerous trial & tribulations. Already facing the harsh reality that they were inferior to the white race. There were many families throughout this story that was faced with this stigma, however it seemed that the Breedloves had it just twice as hard. A series of social problems of which African Americans were

Discrimination in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

1188 words - 5 pages In Toni Morrison’s novel, “The Bluest Eye,” a character named Pecola Breedlove had always been wishing to have the bluest eyes, since it was considered as pretty in the novel’s world. Also, a lighter skin African American, Maureen Peal, bullied Pecola, who has darker skin, because Maureen thinks that she is cute, while she thinks Pecola is ugly. Similarly, Pecola always thought that she was ugly, because she does not have blue eyes. On the

Discrimination in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

1383 words - 6 pages treat others can be a kind of discrimination. Discrimination based on race becomes a global issue these days. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison also contributes how this issue affects from a child’s perspective. It is disappointing to know that racism issue is spreading throughout the world. People don’t seem to realize how this provocative language affects a person. In Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye it mentions racism as one of the factors that

Self-Hatred and the Aesthetics of Beauty in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

1787 words - 7 pages Self-Hatred and the Aesthetics of Beauty in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Topic: Discuss the issues of self-hatred and the aesthetics of beauty in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison. What role do they play in the novel and how do they relate to its theme? Self-hatred leads to self-destruction… Self-hatred is something that can thoroughly destroy an individual. As it was fictitiously evidenced in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, it

"Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison

2716 words - 11 pages in slum housing, and restricted job opportunities were only a few of the many hardships that the African American people had to face at this time. Families often had to separate, social agencies were overcrowded with people that all needed help, crime rates increased and many other resulting problems ensued. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison takes place during this time period. A main theme in this novel is the quest for individual identity and the

Similar Essays

The Bluest Eyes, By Toni Morrison

958 words - 4 pages In “The Bluest Eyes”, the author Toni Morrison portrays the idea of beauty and its standard on African Americans live in the white American society through a narrator named Claudia. The protagonist of Morrison’s novel, Pecola Breedlove, is the truest of all victims, for she is an innocent little girl born into a family that does not provide her with any support to endure society's racial prejudices. The little black girl Pecola is in a mad

"Splits." This Essay Discusses The Breedlove Family From The Novel The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison

1119 words - 4 pages The Breedlove family knows pain. They know their ugliness, too, and therefore they know loneliness, hardship, and misery. Their poverty envelops them in shame, forcing them to accept their defect. The Breedloves find the confinement of their poverty distressing, frustrating, and oftentimes infuriating. Thus, each Breedlove senses that he or she may never experience happiness.In her novel The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison depicts the piteous state of

References To Society In The Bluest Eyes (Toni Morrison)

587 words - 2 pages autobiographical elements, which therefore also make a reference to real society. The story is told from the point of view of a nine year old girl named Claudia MacTeer, which is the age Toni Morrison would have been the year the novel takes place. Like the MacTeer family, Toni Morrison's family struggled during the Great depression.The Bluest Eyes symbolize Pecola's will to have blue eyes. Pecola, a young a black girl, associate being beautiful, happy and

The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison

1369 words - 5 pages In The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison, Pecola Breedlove attempts to measure up to the standard of beauty set by the Master Narrative: an ideological truth imposed by those in power. Pecola, persistent in her attempt to reach the convention of beauty, is never fully satisfied with herself, and quickly becomes obsessed in becoming ‘beautiful. Pecola begins to associate beauty with happiness and respect. This infinite pursuit for beauty has extremely