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The Tales Of Water Essay

943 words - 4 pages

Water, seen as both a fountain of “running water”(Dickens 196) and as a “sea of black and threatening waters”(Dickens 388) in A Tale of Two Cities, is a symbol of the revolution that Dickens views as an idea with the correct fundamental beginnings. However, when uncontrollable, it becomes a “destructive” and “remorseless” mob. This symbol of water can be defined as “the fundamental symbol of all the energy of the unconscious—an energy that can be dangerous when it overflows its proper limits"(Biedermann).
Other than the words fountain and sea there are words like river, it is mentioned seven times and water itself is mentioned forty-three times. The importance of both the fountain scene and ...view middle of the document...

John Fowles, is a British Novelist born in 1926, who wrote that the ocean, "has the attributes of all women, and men too. It can be both subtle and noble, brave and energetic; and far crueller than the meanest, most sadistic human king who ever ruled...In its rages we admire the total lack of reason and justice, the blindness to all but the laws of its own nature"(Brown). Oceans can represent all sorts of things in literature, the fact that Dickens used it to represent destruction instead of any other meaning, coupled with the fact that the word “sea” is mentioned twenty times in A Tale of Two Cities, it speaks for itself as an element that is crucial to the function of the book. The sea itself is representative of the mob in the revolution, claimed to be made “of turbulently swaying shapes, voices of vengeance, and faces”(Dickens 388). These shapes, voices, and faces, are the elements that were in the mob which were in turn in the revolution.
With a similar tone found in both the beginning of the book and the end, a connection can be drawn between the fountain and the sea. A foreboding tone is found in both; the mirroring of the French Revolution has allowed the reader to see the eventual effects of it. With the mentioning of “Fate”(Dickens 196) next to the fountain and how the “sea rushed on”(Dickens 388), the implied next steps are sinister. Although the similar tone allows for a connection to be established, the contrast of ideas was essential to Dickens’ views on the difference between the beneficial mob and the disastrous mob.
Flowing fountains and rising seas are opposing ideas connected to the same base. As Dickens is able to...

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