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The Theme Of Nature In Frankenstein

2340 words - 9 pages

In 1818 Frankenstein was written by Mary Shelley. In Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein brings a creature to life. The creature kills William, Henry Clerval, and Elizabeth. Victor had promised to make a female creature for the creature, but he did not fulfill his promise. This makes the creature enraged. The creature runs away and Victor follows him. Victor gets on a boat with Walton. Victor dies and the creature comes and is very sad that his creator has died. The creature says that he must end his suffering and he jumps into the ocean. In the novel Frankenstein, Shelley uses the theme of nature to show how it is like the characters of the story and how it affects the characters.
The theme of nature is shown throughout Frankenstein to represent the creature. For example the lighting and storm are like the creature. This is illustrated when Victor says,
During this short voyage I saw the lightnings playing on the summit of Mount Blanc in the most beautiful figures. The storm appeared to approach rapidly; and, on landing, I ascended a low hill, that I might observe its progress. It advanced; the heavens were clouded, and I soon felt the rain coming slowly in large drops, but its violence quickly increased. (49)
The lightning and storm are like the creature. The creature might be beautiful in Victor’s eyes, but the creature is also violent and dangerous. The creature is very destructive like the storm; he kills William. It takes Victor a long time to create the creature, but once the creature is created he quickly became violent. In the essay, The Sublime Setting, David Ketterer states, “It is the sublime settings- the region around Mont Blanc and the Arctic wastelands- which predominate among the books scenic effects” ( Ketterer 86). The setting of Mont Blanc is immense. The lightning flashes around it and causes it to be seen. The creature also wants to be noticed. The mountain is very beautiful, but during the storm it may look scary. The creature is can be beautiful through his acts of kindness, like helping people, but also is unattractive and can look and be grotesque. In the essay, “Frankenstein and Mary Shelley’s “wet ungenial summer””, Phillips states,
Some of her descriptions were later incorporated into her novel. In another letter to her sister Fanny, on June 1st 1816, Mary wrote: The thunder storms that visit us are grander and more terrific than I have ever seen before. We watch them as they approach from the opposite side of the lake, observing the lightning play among the clouds in various parts of the heavens, and dart in jagged figures upon the heights of Jura, dark with the shadow of the overhanging could, while perhaps the sun is shining cheerily upon us. (Phillips 3)
Many of Mary Shelley’s ideas came from nature. A storm similar to this one was seen by victor. She uses this storm to describe how Victor sees the creature. Victor thinks the creature is violent at times and beautiful at others. In addition, the creature...

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