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The Theology Of Thoreau. Essay

609 words - 2 pages

The Theology of ThoreauHenry David Thoreau's proposal of self-discovery is the simplest yet most realistic of any scholar in history. While living at Walden Pond and composition his American classic, he revealed the roots of livelihood to all men. Thoreau scripted the proper way towards living life. He implies that a man must discover and understand himself before he can truly live. The swiftest way towards this realization is to get in touch with nature, gain piece of mind, and make the obstructions in your life and dispose of them in order to see things simply.In Walden, Thoreau shifts his lifestyle to that of an outdoorsman. He sets himself on the outskirts of a nearby town and begins by building his own home. "No man was ever more honored in the character of his raisers than I. They are destined, I trust, to assists at the raising of loftier structures one day." Thoreau held the belief that everyman should have a hand in the building and structuring of his own home. So on the side of the hill he raised the frame of his future home and dug o large hole in order to set up his cellar. Once settled into his new home, Thoreau begins to observe the mystifications of the nature surrounding him. With the discovery of ants battling to the death, gnawing upon one another in order to win the struggle for pursuit of superiority, he is entranced and continues to learn how he should begin his refurnished lifestyle. The ant battling gives Thoreau an appreciation for the life he is molding around him.With a new appreciation for life, Thoreau has gained piece of mind from his experience thus far. "All things considered, that is, considering the importance of a man's soul...

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