The Title Of Nobility Amendment Essay

1003 words - 4 pages

There are 33 amendments that have been offered up by Congress of those six flopped ratification by the mandatory three quarters of the state senates and four are officially still awaiting decision before state politicians. Beginning with the eighteenth amendment every amendment that was presented except for the nineteenth amendment and the still unresolved child labor amendment of 1924 has a definite time limit for ratification. There lies a mystery in the very first Thirteenth Amendment, the Titles of Nobility Amendment presented in 1810, which would have eliminated the citizenship of any American acquiring a title of nobility or honor from any foreign power or otherwise, the mystery is whether this amendment was ratified and has been illegally removed from the Constitution (Mount, 2010).
The questions are what happened to this amendment, where did it go, and whether this amendment was actually ratified. The theories that try to answers these questions are that the Title of Nobility Amendment was un-ratified and erroneously printed for about fifty years or may have been ratified and then illegitimately eradicated from the Constitution. Those who say that if the Title of Nobility Amendment is ratified most congresspersons that are lawyers and have the title Esquire would forfeit their citizenship and no longer work in Congress. The lost 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States written exactly as,
“If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them” (U.S. House of Representatives, 2011).
On the primarily reading, the importance of this Amendment looks incomprehensible, inconsequential. The indications to nobility are dismissed for the reason that this amendment seems as a trivial post revolution performance of vindictiveness focused in contradiction of the British (March, 1995).
Consequently, if this amendment were still in effect it would be unachievable for an individual occupying office to receive any honor or endowment from a foreign Power and lawyers who take an title of honor such as Esquires and accept the honor of authority and statuses such as District Attorney and Judge that solely lawyers can hold. Therefore, with these titles and honors along with the special privileges lawyers have many political and monetary benefits over the mainstream populace. With these benefits, lawyers have instituted a two-leveled nationality where the mainstream can vote, however only lawyers can run for political office. There are a few people say that this two- leveled nationality is evidently conflicting to political interests, the country's financial...

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