This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Traditional Architectural Style In The Early 19th Century, In Great Britain

1114 words - 5 pages

In this essay I am aim to explore Pugin’s dissent from tradition through his ideas, inspiration, and his most important works and their meaning. To dissent from tradition is to defy a stultifying tradition or convention, which leads to new, daring styles (Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p.109). The ‘traditional’ architectural style in the early 19th Century, in Great Britain was classicism, inspired by ancient Greece and associated with democracy as well as with the French revolution (Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p. 112). Pugin, called this classical style ‘the new square style’ (Figure 4.7, in Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p.123) and argued that it lacked authenticity of ...view middle of the document...

121). He associated his religion with Gothic style and he strongly believed that through incorporating gothic elements in architecture into Britain’s urban landscape, he could impact the religion of the time. Pugin found his inspiration while travelling to other European countries, particularly in Germany, where the Roman Catholic Church was predominant. (Lűbeck, St Chad’s and Religious Art, 2009).

‘Building without teaching and explaining is almost useless’, Pugin stated, to stress out the importance of writing about architecture. In his written works, he strongly attacked the era or Reformation and Protestantism saying that ‘men must learn that the period hitherto called dark and ignorant far excelled our age and wisdom …’ (Pugin, 2003(1842) pp16-17, in Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p.120) and looked down on the neo-classicism of his time (Figure 4.7, Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p.123). In his book ‘Contrasts’; he called the current classic style a ‘decay of taste’. In the book, he used plates which contrasted the Middle Ages, 14th and 15th Century, with 19th Century. In one example, he presented the Middle Age chapel in all its glory and with a focus on the beautiful altar, while the 19th Century chapel looks more like a theatre and as though it lacks the spiritual feel (Plate 2.4.7, Illustration book, p. 64). The former one highly resembles the St. Chad’s cathedral that Pugin designed later on in life (Introduction, St Chad’s and Religious Art, 2009). The two styles of chapels also meant different functioning – while the central plan of the Protestant Church put the preacher in the middle and surrounded with people, the medieval Roman Catholic Church had a longitudinal plan with the focus on the altar on one side. This clear separation of the priest from the followers created a hierarchy, Pugin believed this important and strived to recreate it in his later works (Richardson, McKellar, Woods, 2008, p. 124). Another plate from Pugin’s book Contrasts shows the difference of the way the poor people were being treated. The 19th Century house for the poor resembled a prison (Plate 2.4.11, Plate 2.4.12, Illustration book, pp. 68-9). It can be seen from the drawings and comments around the building that Pugin strongly associated the better conditions of the past with the greater involvement of the Catholic Church.

While ‘Contrasts’...

Find Another Essay On The Traditional Architectural Style in the Early 19th Century, in Great Britain

Existentialism in the early 19th Century. Speaks of writers and philosophers

1614 words - 6 pages ethical good is the same for everyone; insofar as one approaches moral perfection, one resembles other morally perfect individuals. The 19th-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, who was the first writer to call himself existential, reacted against this tradition by insisting that the highest good for the individual is to find his or her own unique vocation. As he wrote in his journal, "I must find a truth that is true for me

The Utopian Communities of Brook Farm and Oneida in Early 19th Century America

726 words - 3 pages George Ripley, a Harvard graduate and Unitarian minister, started a transcendentalist experiment known as Brook Farm, which lasted from 1841 to 1848. A one hundred and seventy five acre farm owed by Charles and Maria Ellis in West Roxbury, Massachusetts was the location for the community. Brook Farm was set up as a joint-stock company and 24 stocks were issued at $500 a piece. Each share was secured against the assets of the company and the

India in the late 19th century. To what extent could India be considered a 'nation' in the late 19th to early 20th centuries?

698 words - 3 pages Late nineteenth to early twentieth century India, was directly controlled by Great Britain, and therefore, in name, it was a colony of the British Empire and not a nation of its own. However, India could be described as a nation, as the result of India's ability to be self-governing and self-sufficient and the Indian peoples' desire for self-government, as well as various aspects of Indian culture, such as religion, language, customs, and

Why did the "Bloody Code" come into such force in the 18th century, and then was largely abolished in the early part of the 19th century?

1957 words - 8 pages 1830 only 7000 people were executed out of 35,000 sentenced. By 1800 only one in three people sentenced to death was actually hanged. Although more capital offences existed in the 18th century, there were fewer executions than in the 17th century. This is evident by examining the deaths in London and Devon during the early 17th century and the early 18th century (Table 1). More people were sent to the gallows prior to the implementation of the

Prison system of the 18th and the early 19th century

566 words - 2 pages treated as animal and consider less of inhuman because of their lawlessness. They were made to right the wrongs that they have committed either trough physical pain, endure mutilation, torture, mulcted in fines, deprive of liberty, adjudges as slave or even put to death.The American prison as we know began in New York in the early 19th century. "Reformation" was the goal of the founders of the system. During the colonial period and in the early years

The Legacy of Perceptions of Interracial Relationships as Demonstrated in Late 19th and Early 20th Century Black Literature and Events

2057 words - 8 pages The Legacy of Perceptions of Interracial Relationships as Demonstrated in Late 19th and Early 20th Century Black Literature and Events The history of interracial relationships in America is a painfully loaded issue which is still evolving in the consciousness of the 20th century. Because the first instances of sexual integration occurred under the institution of slavery, our understanding of them is necessarily beset with dominance, violence

To What Extent did the Values of the Enlightenment Fuel an 'Industrial Revolution' in Britain in the Late Eighteenth Century and Early Nineteenth Century?

1751 words - 7 pages turn invested in science and technology. Due to the colonial expansions in the seventeenth century, Britain also had huge resources of natural and raw materials which could be brought over with little expense in comparison.In the 'Pre-Enlightenment' period, Daniel Defoe, a writer and journalist published An Essay upon Projects (1697) which was a series of proposals for social and economic improvement. A strong believer in foreign commerce

How does Dickens convey a portrait of society in 19th century in the first 17 chapters of "Great Expectations"

732 words - 3 pages Dickens paints a portrait of 19th century society by not telling us but showing us what he wants us to see. To show us this he uses characters from the criminal, lower and upper classes to dramatise each class. Dickens shows us the lower classes mainly by use of the Gargery family as his example of a typical lower class family, but also uses a few other people in conjunction with the Gargery's. For example he shows us that there was a lack of

Law and Order in Shanghai in 19th and Early 20th Century

3547 words - 15 pages Shanghai in the 19th and early 20th century was a unique city. The combination of its status as an entrepôt, the complexity of its society, and the very existence of the International and French concessions all contributed heavily to the difficulty of protecting law and order within the city. The focus here is on the political and civic; the French Concession is not a major object of concern, as it was subject to many of the same vicissitudes

Ethan Frome and The Great Gatsby: The Progression of Lust and Desire in Early Twentieth Century American Literature

1514 words - 6 pages Ethan Frome and The Great Gatsby: The Progression of Lust and Desire in Early Twentieth Century American LiteratureIntroductionThough the twentieth century can hardly lay an original claim to the use of lust and desire as major themes in literature-these are major driving forces behind human attitudes and behaviors, after all, and this has been reflected in art and literature since man first painted on cave walls-these topics did develop a

The Abolitionist Movement of Slavery from the Early 19th Century to the American Civil War

1557 words - 7 pages are willing to take action and end the practice of slavery are known as abolitionists. These “anti-slaveryites” took huge risks and went through drastic punishments all to end the very nuisance that flawed America, slavery. Slavery is the practice or system of owning slaves, and slaves are people who are held in servitude and as property. In the early 19th century, the United States established a series of statutes and penal codes which were

Similar Essays

Juvenile Crime In 19th Century Great Britain: Changing Views

915 words - 4 pages habits developed. As a result of the amount of theories and ideas formed, the systems put in place were hugely successful and reduced the punishments given to juvenile offenders. Good conduct in Reformatory and Industrial School earned a small sum of money. Therefore, the need for punishment was minimized due to the system of rewards. Throughout the century, the changes made by the government involving the legal treatment of the juvenile offender were made based on people's changing views on the subject. In the end, those changes proved to be greatly beneficial for Great Britain.

An Overview Of Britain In The Early 20th Century

1253 words - 5 pages An Overview of Britain in the Early 20th Century During the early 20th century in Britain, lives for everyone changed dramatically. The population levels increased. From 1901 – 1911 the population increased from 42 million to 45 million. This meant there was an increase in birth and a decrease in death rates. There were very distinct social divisions. At the top were the upper and upper middle classes. They earned

The Brain Drain And Revolution In The Late 19th And Early 20th Century China

1693 words - 7 pages Introduction By the end of the 19th century, Chinese officials were beginning to realize that their country’s educational infrastructure was becoming increasingly anachronistic. Traditional education largely ignored technology—considered it low class, even—and students instead focused on cultivating a sense of moral righteousness. Yet, the Confucian-centered examination system was beginning to prove ineffective in a world where modern

Expansionism In The 19th And Early 20th Century U.S. Was A Departure Of Past American Expansionism

884 words - 4 pages DepartureExpansionism in the 19th and early 20th century U.S. was not a continuation of past American Expansionism. Throughout American history, prime motives for geographical and political expansion have been in support of U.S. economy. As the country grew, many other issues became important in the shaping of American expansionism. Slavery and investment of capital were major forces behind these issues. All these events involved economic