The Trickster God Essay

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Loki is known as the trickster god of Norse mythology and is even said to be one of the first anti-heroes. He is also probably one of the most well-known tricksters as well. In the Norse myths, he is often portrayed as being very mischievous and is always causing trouble for the gods. In fact, “he was so outrageously mischievous that he even sneaked his way into becoming a god” (Allen, and Saunders, par. 1). However, even though he almost always seems to be getting the gods into some kind of trouble, he also helps them at times in an attempt to get them out of their predicaments…even if those predicaments are his own fault to begin with.
Even though Loki was considered to be one of the Aesir, the Norse gods, he was actually the son of a giant, Fárbauti (“Loki”, par. 1). However, his close relationships with the gods, particularly those with Odin and Thor, might explain why he is so commonly accepted as one of them. In fact, in some accounts, it is even said to be that Loki and Odin are blood brothers (McCoy, par. 16). Loki had three wives, the first of which being Glut, who bore him two daughters, Esia and Einmyri, the second being the giantess Angrboda, who bore him three monsters, “the wolf-giant Fenrir, Hel, ruler of the Dead, and the world-serpent Jormungand”, and the third being Sigyn, who bore him two sons, Narve and Vali (McLeish, par. 5). In addition, Loki also gave birth to Sleipnir, a horse that he later gave to Odin, “after shapeshifting into a mare and courting the stallion Svaðilfari” (McCoy, par. 4).
Not only is Loki a trickster, but he is also famous for his shapeshifting, meaning he is “able to take on the appearance of whatever chose” (McLeish, par. 2). Shapeshifting is an ability that few of the Norse gods possess, and it gives Loki quite an advantage when it comes to his mischievous ways. He is seen shapeshifting in many of the Norse myth in which he is featured. Some of his most well-known transformations are those of the “flea, fly, giantess, salmon, seal, and bird” (McLeish, par. 2). He uses these transformations for various reasons, such as “to benefit others”, “to trick them”, and “to save his own...

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