This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The True Meaning Of Cry, The Beloved Country

1543 words - 6 pages

The True Meaning of Cry, the Beloved Country

 
    Many debates have been sparked by Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country.  Even the essence of the book's title examines South Africa and declares the presence of the inner conflict of its citizens. The importance and meaning of the title of Cry, the Beloved Country is visible in Paton's efforts to link the reader to forthcoming ideas in the novel, Paton's description of South Africa's problems, and Paton's prayer for the solution of South Africa's difficulties with race and racial oppression.

 

One way Paton connects the reader to the racial tension in the novel is through the repetition of the thematic title throughout key events in the novel. Paton often uses the wording of the title within the text to express the pain inflicted by South Africa's moral conflict, racial segregation and oppression. Paton uses the repetition to connect events in the story with the overall theme, altering the context slightly each time. At one point, Paton expresses the anguish of the broken African society and the transformation and assimilation into a white man's society of hatred and separation. Paton pleads, "Cry for the broken tribe, for the law and the custom that is gone. Aye, and cry aloud for the man who is dead, for the woman and children bereaved. Cry, the beloved country, these things are not yet at an end" (Paton 73-74). By creating links between major events and minor characters, Paton's repetition slowly delves into one's mind and leaves the indelible mark of a quest for liberty and freedom so that one again views the title, it is as if one sees the cover for the first time, and one realizes how much is held in the few words of "cry, the beloved country."

 

Another way Alan Paton relates the title of Cry, the Beloved Country to the subject matter of the story is through personal identification with the reader's feelings. Paton plays upon the maternal or paternal instincts within everyone, finding a chord and playing upon it, evoking fear or wisdom or sadness through his powerfully chosen yet simple words. At one point, Stephen Kumalo searches for his son in the wide streets of Johannesburg. He fears that his son has done something terribly bad, and for the reverend, this is almost more than he can bear. Paton narrates, "Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear. Let him not love the earth too deeplyÖFor fear will rob him of all if he gives too much" (Paton 80). The reverend's despair is evident in his fear of love for the earth and that which lies within the earth. Because of the appearance of the book's title at such a critical juncture, one cannot keep oneself hereafter from connecting the title of the book to this point in the novel.

 

On the other hand, Paton delves into South Africa's problems with unity and erosion, conveying a sense of how a beautiful country is going to waste due to ...

Find Another Essay On The True Meaning of Cry, the Beloved Country

Cry, The Beloved Country Essay

759 words - 4 pages Beloved Country you read about two very different families and likewise two very different relationships between a father and his son. Deep into the book Stephen Kumalo has discovered that his only son Absalom has committed murder. He visits his son in prison and he admits to killing a white man that he, his cousin, and another man were robbing. After visiting his son in prison, Stephen and his brother John are discussing getting a lawyer. John

Cry the beloved Country Essay

1070 words - 5 pages “The Tragedy is not that things are broken. The tragedy is that they are not mended again.” (1.5.34) Alan Paton wrote Cry the Beloved Country in 1948. During this time South Africa was under Apartheid. The Apartheid was an extreme case of racial discrimination that severely affected South Africa as a country and still continues to affect it to this day. Under the Apartheid African Native peoples were forced to find any sort of work possible that

New Criticism of Cry, the Beloved Country

1010 words - 4 pages New Criticism of Cry, the Beloved Country      Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton can be effectively analyzed using the theory of New Criticism. When beginning to look at the text one must remember not to any attempt to look at the author’s relationship to the work, which is called "intentional fallacy" or make any attempt to look at the reader’s response to the work, which is called the "affective fallacy." First, the central theme of

Africa: Cry the Beloved Country

1791 words - 7 pages FCA's:-Completely summarize plot-Discusses at least 2 themes-Uses at least three quotes from the bookThe book "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil between both whites and blacks over the white segregation policy called apartheid. The book describes how the understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggression; and bringing reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as

Cry, the Beloved Country Essay

2052 words - 9 pages apartheid, and then the election of Nelson Mandela, the first black president of South Africa. These important milestones have shown that South Africa is on the right track, but has not met the full standards that Msimangu has set a goal for. Fortunately, there will be a day in the future where this comes true, where white men and black men come together not for their own personal gain, but for the good of the country of South Africa.

Examining the Theme of Fear in "Cry the Beloved Country"

1382 words - 6 pages Discussion of Fear in Cry, the Beloved CountryCry the Beloved Country is a moving and profound work that deals with the social ills of South African society that led up to the institution of apartheid - the national policy of segregation and discrimination on the basis of race. While there are numerous themes that run throughout the work, the theme of fear is probably one of the most compelling. The fear that plagues South African society

Deterioration of the Tribal System in Cry, the beloved Country

1707 words - 7 pages Throughout the entirety of the novel one of the main points that Paton stresses very heavily is the fact that the tribal system was and is continuing to do deteriorate from start to finish. While his points of view and his opinions on the crumbling of the system are irrelevant Paton does make a fair point in saying that the tribal system and he shows it in various yet numerous parts in the book. Even from the first chapter of the book when

Cry the Beloved Country - the Tribe

1032 words - 4 pages One of the main themes that emerges from reading Alan Paton's, Cry, the Beloved Country, is the importance of tribal life to South Africa because of the identity it gave its people. Through the communal life of the tribe, the structure of stability and morality of the tribe, South Africa's people had a sense of accountability for their own doings, a responsibility towards other and pride in the unity of their people. Tribal life began to break

Inevitability of Change Revealed in Cry, the Beloved Country

1158 words - 5 pages into an argument with his wife and unintentionally hurts her feelings, he is quick to apologize and, as an attempt to make up for what he has done, goes into the church and presumably begs the Lord for forgiveness.  Only a man with true compassion and love would go to such great lengths to make up for a wrong.      In chapter 4 of Cry, the Beloved Country, Kumalo makes a journey to Johannesburg to help his sister

Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

767 words - 3 pages Cry, the Beloved Country is such a controversial novel that people tend to forget the true meaning and message being presented. Paton’s aim in writing the novel was to present and create awareness of the ongoing conflict within South Africa through his unbiased and objective view. The importance of the story lies within the title, which sheds light on South Africa’s slowly crumbling society and land, for it is the citizens and the land itself

Detailed Study of Passage in Cry, the Beloved Country

1044 words - 4 pages Detailed Study #2 Cry, the Beloved Country In this passage, the author details the reactions of parents who receive letters about and from their son who is soon to be executed. This extract contains three sections, all of about the same length. The first paragraph in the excerpt contains only one character, Stephen Kumalo, who has opened one of four letters which he has received and grieves over the news that his son will be hanged. He

Similar Essays

Cry The Beloved Country Essay

992 words - 4 pages In South Africa there have been many injustices in the past years but the real tragedy is that people realize that these problems are there but has not tried to eliminate them. In Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton the tribe has been broken through the actions of mass amounts of people but when it comes to making the future better only a few individuals step up to the plate. In all parts of South Africa people carry out there daily lives

Cry, The Beloved Country Essay

669 words - 3 pages In the 1940s, South Africa was under the cloud of violence and racism. "Cry, The Beloved Country" gives the reader the perfect perspective on the breakdown in the native tribe, the cause of violence in South Africa and the restoration of South Africa. The Tribal breakdown started when the whites pitilessly pushed the blacks out of their hometown where the land was so rich that it could be even referred as "holy, being even as it

Cry The Beloved Country Essay

812 words - 4 pages Against the backdrop of South Africa’s racial and cultural problems, Alan Paton uses Biblical references as a way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By using Biblical references in his novel, one can see that Alan Paton was a religious man who hoped that there would be change in his country. Through Cry, the Beloved Country Paton teaches the idea of love thy brother as yourself, as Christ did, in an attempt to show the importance

Cry The Beloved Country Essay

900 words - 4 pages Cry the Beloved Country “Cry for the broken tribe, for the law and the custom is gone. Cry, the beloved country, these things are not yet at an end (Paton, 105).” In Cry, the Beloved Country, it is 1946 and the land reserved for blacks in Ndotsheni, a part of South Africa, is drying up. In the novel written by Alan Paton, young men and women begin to leave Ndotsheni for the new city Johannesburg. One of those gone is John Kumalo, a