"The Great Gatsby" By: F. Scott Fitzgerald The Tragic Result Of The American Dream In It's False Reality

746 words - 3 pages

The Great Gatsby, a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Has a central theme, the American Dream and it's tragic result of those who attempt to capture its false reality. For Jay Gatsby, the dream becomes real through wealth and power, and he maintains that all this glory will result in happiness. To get this bliss Jay chooses to use the drive of love to justify the illegal ways of reaching "the American Dream". Many of the 19th century Transcendentalists' ideals of the American Dream focused on reaching goals by honest, hard work. Jay Gatsby, the central figure of the story, is a character whom does not follow this value. He devotes the majority of his adult life trying to recapture the past and, finally, dies in its pursuit. In this pursuit, Jay had a love affair with the beautiful and enchanting Daisy Fay. Knowing he could not marry her because of the difference in their social status, he leaves her to accumulate his wealth to reach her standards. Once he acquires this wealth, he moves near to Daisy, "Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay (83)," and throws extravagant parties, hoping by chance she might show up at one of them. He, himself, does not attend his parties but watches them from a distance. When his hopes don't show true he asks around casually if anyone knows her. Soon he meets Nick Carraway, a cousin of Daisy, who agrees to set up a meeting, "He wants to know...if you'll invite Daisy to your house some afternoon and then let him come over (83)." Gatsby's personal dream symbolizes the larger American Dream where all have the opportunity to get what they want. Gatsby still believes that Daisy loves him. Nick attempts to show Jay the flaw of his dream, but Jay innocently replies to Nick's statement that the past cannot be relived by saying, "Can't repeat the past?...Why of course you can!" (116). This shows the confidence that Jay has in reviving his relationship with Daisy. For Jay, his American Dream is not material possessions, although it may seem that way. He only comes into riches so that he can fulfill his true dream, Daisy.Gatsby doesn't rest until his dream is finally lived. However, it never comes about and...

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