This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The United Nations And Human Rights: Has The United Nations Failed In Its Determination To Support And Advocate For Human Rights?

3896 words - 16 pages

I. Introduction
The supporting and advocating on behalf of human rights has been one of the primary principles of the United Nations. Since its founding in 1945, the United Nations has worked to preserve the basic human rights and fundamental freedoms it believes to be deserved of by every man, woman, and child on the planet. Throughout the near seventy years of the United Nations’ existence, it has been challenged with an array of questions, events, and claims regarding the possible violation of human rights. In order to combat these claims, the body has established two organizations to deal with matters of human rights. The first being the Commission Human Rights, was the original organization, founded in 1946. The Commission existed until March of 2006, when it was disbanded amidst controversy and criticism of its member-states having poor human rights records, and was consequently replaced with the Human Rights Council.
Ironically, the Human Rights Council has now come under debate and criticism. The council is now facing controversy oddly similar to that of its predecessor: member-states having poor human rights records. Claims, which will be examined within this investigation, are being made that accuse the Human Rights Council of investigating human rights violations on a political system, and not solely for the support and protection of said human rights. This brings a question to the forefront: has the United Nations failed in its determination to support and advocate for human rights? This investigation plans to answer that question.
The investigation of this question is significant in the overall protection of human rights. While there is structure and methods in analyzing and intervening on behalf of the rights and freedoms of all persons, it is critical that these methods be analyzed in their approach, impact, and effectiveness at shedding light on human rights violations, thus improving the status of human rights, and protecting the rights and fundamental freedoms from any further attack. This, in turn, helps to advance the freedoms of all persons, generating improvements in the overall quality of life that each person may receive as a result from having these international rights and freedoms.
In order for a complete analysis, the structure of the United Nations itself will be analyzed. In addition to this, the protocol for the intervention of the United Nations on behalf of human rights will be investigated, as will a series of issues regarding human rights violations in China and Burma (now Myanmar), and whether or not the United Nations, if involved, was able to support and advocate for human rights.
II. A Summary and Description of the United Nations
Purpose, Functions, and Structure of the United Nations
Before we are able to determine the success or failure of the United Nations in its determination to advocate and support human rights on an international scale, it is imperative that we come to an understanding of the...

Find Another Essay On The United Nations and Human Rights: Has the United Nations failed in its determination to support and advocate for human rights?

Guantanamo Bay And Human Rights Violations by the United States

1743 words - 7 pages human rigts concludes that there is no correlation between the information provided and its effectiveness in fighting terrorism. The United States should allow the FBI, who has successfully used empathetic methods, to acquire information from suspected terrorists only after enough evidence have been gathered to prove their ties to terrorist organizations. Overall, the detention center must close and the US must regain our status as a nation that respects human rights, not tread on them.

Is the West Imposing Its Values on Developing Nations through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

2425 words - 10 pages strategies that impose western values on developing nations (Foley, 2009). Finally, this essay will address cases between 2000 and the present, where western human rights groups have acted imperialistically in non-west societies, and how their actions either caused more chaos, or proved to be beneficial for the parties involved because of the imposition of western morals. The concept of human rights, as it is known today, expresses western

The United Nations

2839 words - 11 pages , all forms of violence and exploitation and those with disabilities. UNICEF responds in emergencies to protect the rights of children. In coordination with United Nations partners and humanitarian agencies, UNICEF makes its unique facilities for rapid response available to its partners to relieve the suffering of children and those who provide their care. UNICEF is non-partisan and its cooperation is free of discrimination. In everything it does

The United Nations

917 words - 4 pages capacity to impose peace by force. The United Nations relies on the power of persuasion and moral authority.The pursuit of human rights was one of the central reasons for creating the United Nations.A weakness of the United Nations is that it is not an independent organisation; it is made up of states, so actions by the UN depend on the will of Member States, to accept, fund or carry them out. It requires a complex process of consensus building that

The United Nations

4087 words - 16 pages the human rights situation in Haiti and Guatemala. A similar operation was in place in El Salvador from 1991 to 1995. Self-determination and independence One of the most important rights self-determination, or the right of peoples to govern themselves was a goal when the Charter was signed. Today it has become a reality in most of the lands formerly under colonial rule. In 1960, the General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the

The United Nations

1660 words - 7 pages other groups in Australia and demonstrate how its role within the United Nations has shaped those rights and freedoms. The use of appropriate and relevant historical sources will assist in strengthening student familiarity of ICT so that they may explain different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past. Students will also have the opportunity to select and use appropriate text forms to demonstrate their growing knowledge and to

The United Nations

1407 words - 6 pages hopes, the many frustrations on the ground and the sometimes bitter disappointments in the end”(Thakur 43). Even though the United Nations has its great deal of power and impact in the world, it is not always successful to achieving the peace for everyone. Take for example the 1995 Bosnian Massacre, also known as the Srebrenican Massacre, totaled to more than 8,000 deaths of mainly men and young boys. Srebrenica is a city in Bosnia that was

India and the United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

6677 words - 27 pages interests in mind and participate only where it suits our national policies. Altruistic/ Good Samaritan commitments are best avoided." India's Role in the United Nations Peacekeeping OperationsTime and again, India has endangered the lives of its soldiers in peacekeeping operations of the United Nations, not for any considered achievement, but in service of an ideal. India's main aim was and remains to support the world body and maintain

The Relations of the United States and the United Nations

4987 words - 20 pages , the US will finally forsake it because it will be unable to work in the US’s national interest, and it will sink into the obscurity of history. American Support for a Realist Charter The US has powered the UN since its beginnings in the wake of WWII. It began as US President Roosevelt’s vision for “Four Policemen”—the US, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and China—to maintain peace in the postwar world. The UN, as Roosevelt saw it, was to

League of Nations and United Nations

945 words - 4 pages economic and social progress; identifying solutions to international economic, social and health problems; facilitating international cultural and educational cooperation; and encouraging universal respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.However, we must note that its successes were mainly peacekeeping jobs after wars and humanitarian aid.CONCLUSIONEven though the United Nations had failed in many cases to prevent an armed conflict, it had

Human Rights and the Issues of Self-Determination

2024 words - 8 pages needs of the community within the state. Finally, I will elaborate more over the “Responsibility to Protect” of the International Community and Organizations, and the United Nation’s role to protect the citizens of a “failed state”. Human Rights and the Right for Self-Determination First of all, the human rights are universal. Although the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, the

Similar Essays

The United States, The United Nations, And Global Human Rights

5987 words - 24 pages The United States Positioning as a World Superpower: Its Subsequent Influence in the United Nations and Views Regarding Human Rights “America stands at this moment at the summit of the world.” -Winston Churchill, 1945 As World War II came to a close, a new need for an international peacekeeping organization became apparent in order to maintain peaceful relations among nations in the post-World War II era. The United Nations (UN) came

An Assesment Of The United Nations And Why It Has Failed In Its Duties

612 words - 2 pages of the UN's disarmament committee. Contrast this with the fact that in May 2001, the US was dumped from the United Nations Commission for Human Rights, despite having been a founding member in 1947. Instead, the overseeing of human-rights abuses is left to one-party states such as China, Cuba, Pakistan and its Chair Libya.Libya! A police state ruled by a mad dictator (Colonel Qaddafi) who hates Israel and has a passion for acquiring his own

United Nations Human Development Report And The Need For International Democratization

1801 words - 7 pages casualties and child soldiers). Democracy is also seen as the only choice for human development due to its (a) reflection of the needs of future generations in current policies, (b) response to citizens’ needs through economic and social policies, and (c) dual accountability through action by civil society and through structures of representation and delegation. This discussion of democratic human rights and freedoms sounds all too utopian and

Human Rights In The United States

1789 words - 7 pages basic principles and help set a solid foundation to implement human rights to the Iraqi people. A study conducted by the Fafo Institute for Applied Social Science says that malnutrition rates have increased four percent to eight percent since the U.S led the invasion in March 2003 (Foster). Malnutrition has been rising because the Iraq government cannot afford to help its people. Over 400,000 Iraqi children suffered from malnutrition in 2004