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The Unification Of The Church Essay

1581 words - 6 pages

Context
The letter of Ephesians is the tenth book in the New Testament, its authorship is attributed to Paul after his conversion from a persecutor of Christians to apostle. The legitimacy of his authorship is still debated by scholars. Harold Hoehner in his book “Ephesians: An Exegetical Commentary,” lists a number of reasons why many scholars reject Paul as the author. But, for the purposes of this exegetical Paul is considered the author of the letter.
It is estimated that the letter was written in A.D 60-61 (Arnold, 3). It is thought that it was also meant for many other churches located in that area. Accordingly, during this time Paul was a prisoner in Rome for two years. (Hoehner, 92).
Paul wrote the letter to the church in Ephesus which was located in Western Asia Minor. It was an important city in the Roman Empire because it represented a multi-ethnic commercial region, and it was largely populated. Ephesus was also filled with many pagans customs like the cult to Artemis, gods, and magic practices (Arnold, 3-5). Still, because they had heard the gospel that Paul had shared to them, many Jews and Gentiles converted to Christianity.
Like most of Paul's letters, Ephesians is very structured and it consist of an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Ephesians can be divided into two, which separates the theological basis for Christian unity, and the practical instruction for its maintenance (Patzia, 228).
The progression of the letter starts with an introduction by Paul where he greets and bless his audience, the church of Ephesus, and introduces himself. It follows on explaining that they have been predestined in God's plan for His glory. It continues by stating that we have dead because of our sins but now we are alive by God's grace. Furthermore that the Gentiles have been brought into the plan and are united with the Jews in one body. Also, he instructed them to change the way of living, it sets guidelines for husbands and wives, parents and children, slaves and masters. The letter ends with an exhortation to trust in the great power of God and he concludes with a farewell to the church.
Ephesians 4:1-6 falls in section IV of the outline. Paul urges people to live a Christlike life. Which relates perfectly with the rest of the letter, an exhortation to be united as the body of Christ in love. The paragraph before, Ephesians 3: 14-19, relates to the passage because it says that they have been rooted and grounded in love, and in consequence Chapter 4 Paul urges them to bear with one another in love. And the paragraph after, Ephesians 4: 7-16. relates to the passage because it says that they ought to attain the unity of the faith and Chapter 4 says there is one faith.

Paul while in prison urges the Ephesians to live worthy of the calling that they have called. (v.1)

I, therefore, the prisoner for the Lord, urge you to live worthily of the calling with which you have been called.

Paul begins chapter 4 with...

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