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The United States And Assault Rifles

1353 words - 6 pages

The United States of America was founded on laws to stop a single person from ruling the country. These laws were later known as the Bill of Rights, which lists every living person’s rights. On this Bill of Rights is what is know as the Second Amendment which gives United States citizens the right to bear arms. Over the years this amendment has been questioned by the government on how it affects the safety of citizens. Safety is important and the new high-capacity magazines could be a true threat to America's safety.

As big of a threat as they may seem, assault rifles are not the first major weapon to wreak havoc on the citizens of the United States. If we take a time machine back in time, we can see that when there are weapons crimes can happen. The greatest example of weapons being a threat on the United States would be the lever-action weapons. These weapons had pre-made firing cartridge that fired faster than the common musket. These new rifles were developed and mass produced during the American Civil War. The lever action rifle was more accurate and could shoot two hundred yards further than the standard smoothbore Model 1842. This made the Henry lever action rifles some of the most feared rifles in its era. Now, no mass shootings were recorded using a rifle like this, on civilians that is, but it has been used in some of the biggest and bloodiest battles in the American Civil War.(Pritchard, Russ A. Civil War Weapons and Equipment. Globe Pequot, 2003.). The United States used these new fast firing rifles to completely annihilate one another in the Civil War, but the Henry Lever action rifle was just the beginning of the fast firing rifle systems.

As the world began to evolve it became clear that the need for better guns would be needed to fight off enemies. With these ideals came the semi-automatic weapons of the nineteenth century. These weapons became a starting point for what would soon become what we know as fully automatic weapons. The world would soon be shocked by the amount of force these new weapons would have. In the late 1890s the M1911 was being designed as the first semi-automatic pistol. This design lead to greater and more powerful weapons to be used in the First and Second World War. The weapons used in the World Wars were by far the most advanced of their time. The new weapons produced three times the amount of firepower either sides of the Civil War could produce at any given time. These weapons were feared by the citizens of the time. These new weapons consisted of the Thompson, a submachine gun, which fired a .45 caliber bullet at high velocities. This rifle became the standard fully automatic rifle for the United States Armed Forces. Though this weapon had a very important role in winning the war, it was also used in various crimes throughout the United States in the early nineteenth century. Does this make this rifle a bad thing to own? While some would argue that the weapon was a threat to...

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