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The United States And The Fight Against Mexican Immigration

816 words - 3 pages

In the United States it should be a crime not to speak English and Spanish, yet in today’s society Spanish is the second dominant language in the world. There are job posting hiring bilinguals who speak English and Spanish, and are willing to pay top dollar salary for people abilities to do so. The United States should take Spanish in as a second language, by committing these types of actions would then lead the United States raining supreme over other countries in the world, by having two dominant languages. The United States should not fight against Mexican Immigration but embrace imagination with open arms.
First of all, if the United States accepted Spanish immigration it would benefit the economy’s unwanted job ratios. Many immigrates who live in the United States work jobs that most Americans would not do for an honest living. As author Linda Chavez who is a chairperson of equal opportunity of Washington D.C.states, “Legal immigrates have an 86-percent rate of participation in the labor forces” (587). In the United States, most of the jobs that immigrates have are jobs that Americans find to be demeaning, For an example janitorial, fast food restaurants, hotel housekeeping and landscaping are just a few to name. Immigrates in America not only do the job and do them well, they become entrepreneurs and create more jobs for the American people. Many jobs today are demanding all candidates to be bilingual in English and Spanish.
Secondly, Mexican immigrates bring more culture and diversity to America, i.e. the day of the dead, which is the celebration of a decease family member or friend, in which Mexican immigrates would build an alter filled with his or her favorite foods; this is done once a year. Unlike Americans who celebrate the death of a love one or friend on the day of their funeral. Another cultural impact Mexican immigrates bring to America is Cinco de Mayo, one of the most celebrated holidays in the United States for Mexican culture. Mexicans bring diversity to the United States by integrating Spanish in its English barriers. Another diversity Mexican immigrates bring to the United States is the closeness of their families. Mexicans show Americans that family comes first and no family member is left behind, and all are welcome with open arms, despite the crowdedness non- spacious environment.
Furthermore, Mexican immigrates create diversity in the United States Food Industries.
Unlike author Samuel Huntington who is a political professor at...

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