This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The United States' Outlook On Foreign Policy Affairs

1140 words - 5 pages

The United States' Outlook on Foreign Policy Affairs

The United States outlook on foreign policy affairs after World War II was influenced by the fear of communist expansionism rather than establishing foreign relations with each country. The U.S. found itself with a conflict between its profound belief in the constitution and democracy and a need for domestic and national security. In 1947, the National Security Act authorized the creation of the Central Intelligence Agency. Its role was to protect domestic security and oversee national relations. Following World War II the Cold War intensified and the anti communist sentiment consumed our country. The actions of the CIA conflicted with that of the constitution and the morality of the American people. Many actions taken by the CIA were secret and covert. Since congress would be required to approve or disapprove of any involvement in a third world country the CIA would keep their actions quiet and not inform the congress. The CIA adopted interventionism policies in third world countries to stop communism and promote our ideology. It was not always known how much the president and his advisors were aware of the covert activities of the CIA. In order to understand our foreign policy concerning third world countries it is important to consider the assumptions, policies and tactics of President Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Nixon.
In 1945 Harry Truman took office suddenly and was expected to keep our country and our nation together. Truman’s main objective was to create a foreign policy that would control the spread of communism through out the world including third world countries. While facing the Korean War and trying to stop and contain communism Truman thought that it was time to either get out, or begin a strike on China. The United States knew that a “war against China might well mean war against Russia, which Truman was not prepared to accept.” (Ambrose, Rise to Globalism) Truman reversed the prior United States policy of unilateral disarmament and neutrality to an arms build up and collective security. He made America stronger than it had ever been seen before and helped in creating the United States in becoming a world power.
In 1952, Dwight Eisenhower was elected president and immediately became extremely popular. He also shared Truman’s basic view of American foreign policy. Eisenhower also perceived communism as a force struggling for world supremacy. Eisenhower and his secretary of state, John Dulles, and his brother Allen, who headed up the CIA, felt that containment did not go far enough to stop communist expansion. A more aggressive policy was established. It was during this era that the CIA began more covert actions within the third world countries. In Operation Success the CIA engaged in paramilitary activity to over-throw the leader of Guatemala, a Russian controlled dictator. This policy has continued through many presidential administrations. President Eisenhower...

Find Another Essay On The United States' Outlook on Foreign Policy Affairs

United States Foreign Affairs Between 1914 and 1945

1523 words - 6 pages The evolution of the United States’ foreign relations between 1914 and 1945 can be described as a turbulent teenager coming into her own; a coming of age. In the early portions of the three decades, like most teenagers, the U.S. was solely focused on herself and on rare occasion looked outside her own door to see how the lives of her neighbors and family (Europe) were being impacted by events. There is a belief that so goes Wilson, so goes the

The Cold War and The United States Foreign Policy

963 words - 4 pages It’s Getting Hot in Here: The Cold War’s Not So Cold Affect on United States Foreign Policy Veronica Bis AP United States History Mr. Thornton May 24, 2014 The events of The Second World War launched the world’s nations headfirst into a period of united social consciousness unprecedented in world history. Human Rights became a main topic in global discussion and were embraced and enforced largely by the newly

The United States Immigration Policy

1503 words - 7 pages which is deportation, and finally they reveal the harsh and unnecessary lock up of immigrants. The author’s purpose is to reveal the harshness of the U.S’s immigration policy in order to persuade the reader to change the immigration policy of the United States. They adopt a rather negative tone for the current immigration policy and try to connect with the readers emotions. Whether or not an American citizen has a positive or negative outlook on

Policy of the United States

771 words - 4 pages . Emilio Aguinaldo This is Emilio Aguinaldo (1864-1964). At age 36 he led the fight of the Filipino nationalists against the United States. Deriding this view of U.S. foreign policy, Gitlin apparently wants readers to believe that he no longer thinks that U.S. interactions with other nations are consistent outgrowths of U.S. capitalism, international market forces, the historic north/south division, and reasons of state. Instead, Gitlin purports to

United States Foreign Policy Involvement with Latin America

1059 words - 5 pages politicians resolved that, “US foreign policy could be made on the assumption that the unbalanced system could never be effectively addressed by Central Americans. The United States then continued to integrate with Latin America into its political, economic and military orbit. While the findings suggested the challenges and limits relying on an authoritarian government, American dollars steadily increased their presence in El Salvador

An analysis of United States foreign policy with Russia

3637 words - 15 pages economic integration. The United States supports Russia's accession to global economic organizations such as the WTO, OECD, the Paris Club, and the Asian Development Bank. They are the largest foreign investors in Russia, with portfolio and direct investments of approximately $3 billion. They continue to encourage the Russians to make progress on legislation and administrative changes necessary to create a more favorable investment climate for

A Clouded Future. This essay discusses the current United States Foreign policy and the effects it will have on the country in the future

2328 words - 9 pages on with favoritism. The United States must realize that its actions are held in accordance with the global community and that we must be held accountable for our actions.With these mounting issues and problems the United States must find a way to adapt to new policy and ideology. The United States now has to figure out a way to right some of its wrongs and formidably modify itself to this new and changing global community where the link between

Emigration from Europe to the United States of America in 1880-1930 and its Impact on the Foreign Policy of the Countries

1706 words - 7 pages sought for gold pyramids of Indians, then in America outsiders found their home. According to the website of United Nations, The United States of America, a country created from 13 colonies, is now ranked first by foreign-born population (2013). It is worth noting that the immigration to the USA was not always constant. Historians distinguish four periods when the rate of immigration was enormous, so-called "waves". The first wave continued until

Foreign Students in the United States

953 words - 4 pages Many foreign students come to the United States for an education. They might think that American education is better, or perhaps, has advantages that are not found in their own country. I am from Ukraine and I am currently studying at Utah Valley State College. What conclusions can be drawn about an American education compared to a Ukrainian education? There are many advantages and fewer disadvantages of receiving an education in the United

The Drug Policy in the United States

2990 words - 12 pages that have been made are amendments added to strengthen the original laws on these drugs that are in our country, and make them even stricter. Even though there are many laws that control drugs in the United States, the U.S. Drug Policy is one that is easy to follow and obey. It is well known that in order to stay in the clear an individual should stay clear of drugs altogether, unless they are prescribed by a physician

How can Republic of Korea foreign policy towards Japan and China affect the United States in the region?

1317 words - 6 pages trilateral summits. Strengthening Factors of Relations Generally, South Korea and China share similar goals and common interests in East Asia and the Korean Peninsula. Both states share an arguably similar stance on North Korea and share concerns about the future of Japan. First, North Korea remains the primary foreign policy concern for South Korea, and on this matter, Chinese and South Korean strategies have been more complementary than

Similar Essays

United States Foreign Affairs Essay

1306 words - 5 pages The objective of the United States foreign policy, per President Barack Obama, is to do "everything we can to protect American citizens," and also states it is his highest priority.12 Since the Cold War, and particularly after the September 11 terrorist attacks, the United States has seriously set their sights on foreign affairs and spreading democracy for the betterment of the world. Most recently, the United States foreign affairs have

United States Foreign Policy Essay

1926 words - 8 pages The counterfactual that I will be engaging addresses what would have occurred if Saddam Hussein would not have invaded the small country of Kuwait. The United States foreign policy has been shaped by the timeline of the invasion of Kuwait. This counterfactual, using this introductory timeline, will then present information on theories for the United States sanction of establishing the coalition forces and how this would have affected the

United States Foreign Policy And The War On Terrorism

1622 words - 6 pages United States Foreign Policy and the War on Terrorism In very general terms, it could be said that the United States makes foreign policy decisions based on what we hope are the best interests of its citizens. On the surface, it would appear as if this has been the case over the past several months, as the U.S. has waged its war against terrorism. If one were to penetrate this surface, however, they would see that there is much more to

Contemporary Foreign Policy In The United States

2025 words - 9 pages The contemporary foreign policy of the United States represents an evolving continuum of principles, conceptions and strategies that in part, derived from the particularistic American Cold War experience. As such, United States foreign policy is neither a static entity, nor is its intentions or direction uncontested. This essay will examine the underlying issues of identity and how, beginning with the Truman Doctrine, a distinct articulation of