The Value Of Love – An Analysis Of Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

776 words - 3 pages

How much is true love worth? Would you pay ten dollars, a hundred dollars, or all the money of the world for true love? In sonnet 29, William Shakespeare demonstrates the fact that even though a person may be poor and without any honor, if he has true love, he is richer than kings. The poem's theme is that even though you may be poor physically and in the eyes of people, true love is worth more than all the wealth of the world.From the start of the first stanza of the poem, the sadness of the speaker is very easy to see. We learn that the reason for his sadness is that he is "in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes". He has neither money, nor honor. He cries to himself because he is an outcast in society. He also complains to heaven but his complaints remain unanswered. The imagery of crying and complaining suggest that the speaker is very unhappy with his state. The line "And look upon myself and curse my fate" depicts the intensity of unhappiness that the speaker has. The speaker is so unhappy that he is cursing himself. The reason for his unhappiness is that he himself has not found the true value of love yet.In the second stanza, the speaker decides that he is fed up with himself and wants to be someone else. In the line "Wishing me like one more rich in hope" he tells us that he wants to be someone who is richer both in the sense of money and hope. He also wants to be someone who has friends and a place in society. He wants "this man's art and that man's scope." His sadness has put him into such a situation that he is not even happy with the things he used to enjoy the most. The whole stanza reveals that the speaker thinks that he has nothing of value and therefore wants the things of other people. Basically he is saying that he has no money, hope, friends or skill and wishes to be someone else who has these things. The reason why the speaker wants the skills of other people is that he still has not found the true value of his love, the thing that he has.By the start of the third...

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