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The View Of Nature Essay

797 words - 4 pages

The Romantics had a unique connection and view of nature. In many ways nature was like a religion to them. They worshiped and cherished nature and its beauty. The contemporary view of nature is largely based on what can be proved by science. People now believe what can be verified by scientists as the truth, but there are a few exceptions to that. Some people now want to protect nature like the romantics wanted to all those years ago. Romantics looked to find the answers to their questions in nature.
Artists and poets from the romantic era worked hand in hand to show the beauty and power of nature. They believed nature had a healing power for your emotions. Romantics believed you should ...view middle of the document...

Their attitudes towards nature is really nonexistent because they really don’t care about it. Maja and Reuben summarized very nicely how people who still care about nature feels in there article for Green Museum. They stated “Nature as subject in contemporary art acts as a barometer of ecological attunement, while correspondingly artists contribute to a progressive shift in how we relate to and envision nature”. Nature is the parent of lots of out arts and poems to this day.
There are a lot of similarities to the contemporary view and romantic view of nature. Each era believes that nature is where it all started. Many of the artists and writers from the romantic era got there inspirations from nature; likewise many of the artists and writers from today’s age get their inspirations from the artists and writers from the romantic era. While artists love to get there inspiration from nature and things involved with nature today, there are a lot of just ordinary people who love to be out in nature. The societies from the romantic era like people today loved to be in nature and surrounded by its beauty. The contemporary view like the romantic view of nature is that the more you can be around it...

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