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The War On Drugs Essay

3630 words - 15 pages

Drugs have been around for thousands of years and were used for a variety of reasons. They were used for healing aliments that one might have and for recreational reasons. However, as time went on and society advanced so did its outlook on any form of a controlled substance and their uses. We began to see the benefits they had and developed other ways to use them for everyday illnesses, which wasn’t anything new, but we finally had the ability to understand why they helped. In the late 1800s Coke-a-Cola marketed their drink, or tonic, as having healing properties and claimed that if was a cure all. But, as time wore on we began to see the negative side and decided to control it for fear of what would happen, which lead to Prohibition and the war on drugs.
We saw a threat and had to act for fear that it would become a problem that could no longer be contained. People who once used the drugs as a tonic to cure a cough discovered that they could be used for pleasure and would develop a “habit.” Yet the more society said it was wrong the more appealing it seemed to be to the people who wanted to use drugs for fun and saw no harm in it. The government tried to put a ban on any substance that they saw unfit for the people, which made the desire to obtain it that much greater.
Drugs come in many forms and are called by many names. Some are worse than others, but they all have the same effect, they can destroy the mind and body. They cause problems within the person that can spread beyond just the individual taking them. They have been known to rip families apart and destroy relationships, yet people still choose to use them. It seems that the need to keep one from using drugs only drives them to want it more. The need to go against what’s seen as wrong grows when they know that it is seen as taboo and forbidden. People are drawn to the things they cannot have and what they know little about. Others see it as a way to escape reality or avoid problems that they have no desire to face or deal with. It doesn’t matter what the government or society tries, people will always find a way to get what they want no matter the price they have to pay.
In the late 1800s people began to see the effect alcohol, which is a drug, had on people and society. This started the era of Prohibition trying to outlaw any beverage containing alcohol and put a stop to people drinking and this only led to society fighting harder to get what they wanted even though it was viewed as wrong and immoral to consume it. People who wanted to continue either drinking or making alcohol found ways to get around the laws and continue doing what they wanted. Bootleggers, people who made alcohol during Prohibition, moved their operations into the woods out of the public eye and continued to brew what we now call Moonshine in order to keep up with the demand for alcohol.
It didn’t stop at hiding the manufacturing spots. Bar owners who were worried about losing patrons would create...

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