The Writings Of Thomas Aquinas Essay

662 words - 3 pages

"Thomas Aquinas: Scholastic Theologian and the Creator of the Medieval Christian Synthesis" reinstated the mind of reasoning and the understanding of what education is. Aquinas indeed was a very intellectual person of his time and understood what it meant to be educated; as well as what it means to be a teacher. His beliefs and research shows that he is not only a great theologian but a man that understood the essence of education and reformed it to make it sensible to others. Thomism or the philosophy of Aquinas described how people were looked into two different ways and not just one; one being the supernatural and the other one being the natural. Another distinctive thing that he did was he own definitions of what education, schooling, teaching, and learning were all about. These core definitions aided him in our understanding of what it means to be an educated person in all aspects of the world and not just one.

Aquinas beliefs on "Of Sacred Doctrine: Its Nature and Extent" showed society his views and beliefs of how things are acquired and received. In this, he describes that thru Christianity society will believe more things because we already believe in a higher faith. The faith of this spiritual person came from prior knowledge that was passed down from generation to generation in order to preserve its essence. Then he went on to say that speculation is less important than facts because human beings believe knowledge that is already there and not knowledge that is attained.

"Therefore faculty stands to operation, as essence to being; and understanding, in creatures, is a faculty of the being who understands" describes he beliefs on the people who have the understanding of the previous knowledge and how they can become the teacher. In addition to this, faculty retains the knowledge and then passes it on to people who have yet to discover the knowledge....

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