Theatre Of The Absurd (1950’s Present) Essay

1040 words - 5 pages

World War Two spanned six years and claimed countless lives. Some died from gunshot wounds, others from the famine that the war left them, while hundreds of thousands more were eviscerated by atomic fire. The total casualties of the war are estimated to be well over 60 million, which at the time was about 2.5% of the Earth’s population. Many forms of protest arose from the ashes of histories bloodiest conflict, but few were more unusual than the Theatre of the Absurd. I have completed extensive research on this art form and am more than qualified to discuss the history of the aforementioned theatre style. During my research, I have found enticing information in regards to how this art ...view middle of the document...

” Review by Sarah Lucie. This is what absurdity is all about, the plot is dark and obscure, and these productions usually end the same way they began. Although the first form of the absurdist theatre style occurred in the 1940’s, the name “Theatre of the Absurd” wasn’t officially coined until the 1950’s, which is when these types of productions gained popularity. When this style was formed, its only purpose was to capture the pain of tragic events, and the feeling of being trapped. However, as this art form evolved, so did its message.
The Theatre of the Absurd gained significant popularity in Europe and North America in the mid to late 1950’s and for the majority of the 1960’s. During this time, the absurdist theatre style started to expand its message beyond that of just hopeless, and instead started to provide commentary on the human condition as a whole. One of the most famous, and controversial Absurdist play is “Waiting for Godot”, written by renowned absurdist playwright, Samuel Beckett. In this play, there are two characters who are waiting for the one called Godot. During the play these two individuals have tremendous difficulty communicating even the simplest concepts. As the play goes on, anticipation builds for the arrival of Godot, but eventually the play ends and Godot never arrives, thus ending the play the same way it began (A distinguished trait of the Theatre of the Absurd). It has been referred to as “the play where nothing happens.” And while critics fume over the perceived pointlessness of this play, supporters see the intended message as “an accurate parable on the human condition in which ‘the more things change, the more they are the same.’” This is a good example of what Theatre of The Absurd was like in the later years. It’s less about the feeling of disparity, and more about how the writer perceives different issues. Since the 1960’s and early 1970’s, the popularity of this art form...

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