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Theme Of Freedom In Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn".

2282 words - 9 pages

Freedom: Everyone yearns for it.Literature is often used as a method for inspired writers to express there feelings concerning a certain matter or subject. It is not uncommon for writers to subconsciously implant their own values into the reader's minds by using sarcasm throughout the work. Mark Twain is an excellent example of a famous novelist who commonly uses this method of communicating his core values. One of his core values is the question of who deserves certain freedoms. In his novel, "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Mark Twain places the reader in the 19th Century where slavery is commonplace. One of the main characters, Jim, is a slave who longs for freedom. The main character, Huckleberry, also longs for freedom, but to be free from civilization rather than slavery. Throughout the novel, it is made clear to the reader that Huckleberry would strongly prefer independence over restraint.Many facets of Twain's life revolved around independence, and he used aspects of his life to influence him into writing some of the events that occur in Huck Finn. One example would be the Mississippi River, which he had ties to in his early childhood. Mark Twain is the pseudonym of Samuel Clemens, who was born on November 30th, 1835. Mark Twain was an American writer, journalist and humorist, who won many awards for his two most famous pieces: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.Mark Twain was born in the city of Florida, Missouri. Shortly after his birth, his family moved to Hannibal, Missouri. When his father died in 1847, he began working as a printer for his brother's newspaper. This was not his only profession before being an author, as he was also a licensed navigator for the Mississippi River. One of Twain's most famous quotes; "The Mississippi River will always have its own way; no engineering skill can persuade it to do otherwise..." describes the Mississippi River that he spent so much of his life navigating. (Twain Quotes) After the Civil War, the Mississippi River was no longer used as extensively so he decided to move to Virginia City, where he became an editor for a magazine called the Territorial Enterprise. The pen name 'Mark Twain' was officially initiated when he made a travel account using it.Twain was interested in editing, as seen by the fact that he later moved to San Francisco, California where he worked as a reporter. He enjoyed traveling and would tour places such as Hawaii, France, and Italy. Twain described his first trip to Italy as "the first organized pleasure party ever assembled for a transatlantic voyage" (Mark Twain). He had a passion for traveling to Europe to experience what life was like, and to use the experiences to help him write editorials. In order to remember every aspect of Europe, he would publish letters and keep accounts of his travels. The publishing of The Innocents Abroad, a journal containing his recordings, was what set him off as a renowned author. It gained him...

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