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There Are Many Different Kinds Of Love. This Is A Reflection Of This In How Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, George Orwell's 1984 And Oscar Wilde's Picture Of Dorian Grey Deal With The Theme.

772 words - 3 pages

Love is a massive theme that can be seen across many facets of live, it is within everything and everywhere, of course it can be interpreted in many ways. Now making more emphasis on literature, it can be clearly observed how in all the different kinds of novels and fictitious writings, depending on the author the theme of love is interpreted with different aspects usually reflecting on who writes it, hence what that person feels identified with. Subsequently I will discuss three major masterpieces and how their respective authors deal with the theme.To start with we have Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and albeit love not being one of the main themes in the story, it can still be analysed through out. In this novel there can be seen diverse forms of love. First Victor Frankenstein and Elizabeth Lavenza, she starts out as part of the family when Victor's mother, Caroline, adopts her, as the years pass since there are no blood lineage relations between them whatsoever they marry with total approval of the family, now a days that can probably be seen as something unethical as she is a family member after all. This type of love is seen as one based on care as they were raised together, but also on attraction as Victor finds her attractive from the first moment he sees her, the mutual affection they have for each other develops an almost unbreakable emotional bond. We also get to see the love the monster feels towards his creator, this is love fed on hate, as the creature sees Victor as a fatherly figure but also as the reason for his corrupted being and rejection from society.We also have George Orwell's 1984; in this one, yet again, we have more then one structure of love. The classic protagonist relationship between Winston Smith and Julia, apparently unconditional love in which they would sacrifice themselves for one another and nothing can break them apart, however Orwell proves or puts forward this theory in which he suggests that any kind of emotion or feeling can be shattered with pure physical pain and/or psychological torture. Love being the strongest sentiment is destroyed by mind control. Consequently any type of emotion can be...

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