There Is No Need For The Bill Of Rights

1373 words - 5 pages

This is a good way to piss off a professor who used to be a hippie Liked the argument, but didn't agreeThe broad language of the second article of the Constitution left many questions about the power and authority of the President and the Executive branch of the Federal Government. Since George Washington, each Chief Executive has come to the position with different beliefs on the responsibility and power of the President. However the performance of the president is often shaped by outside factors which control how he must act as a Chief Executive. The behavior of presidents come from a number of different criteria. A president's personal character, his approach to the position and circumstances during his term all contribute to presidential behavior.Presidents have approached the office from two vague positions. They have believed, to varying degrees, that either the president has a strong leadership position and broad powers to direct the nation in one direction, or that the president has very limited powers dictated by the Constitution and should act like a chief administrator for the Federal Government. These beliefs were reflected in their behavior while in the White House. Franklin Roosevelt believed that the Federal Government had an obligation and interest in bringing the nation out of the depression. In order to do this he initiated a number of agencies and projects to employ people. In the first 'Hundred Days' of Roosevelt's first term he initiated a number of programs which increased the size of the Federal Government and the power of the President. He did all that he could to see that his proposals were put into place. This included a failed court packing scheme to have a more friendly Supreme Court to find his programs constitutional (Lowi and Ginsberg230.) In contrast to this belief in broad presidential authority by Franklin Roosevelt was Howard Taft. Taft believed that Presidential authority was very limited the constitution and had to be specifically granted to the President by Congress or the Constitution (Lowi and Ginsberg 220.) Another example of a passive approach to the presidency to is George Washington. While he is often seen as a very influential president, his position as the first President require that he had to set many standards. In fact President Washington hoped that the presidency would not be dominate. In his inaugural address he argued for a strong legislature which he received (Lowi and Ginsburg 227.) However, personal beliefs on the role of the president have been minor in the behavior of a President. When required all Presidents have assumed power to quickly deal with a situation.A President's personality and beliefs are also a factor in determining his actions as a President. Barber argues that a person's personality is shaped by his character, world view, and style all of which are established at different times in his life. He argues that a person's character is established early in life, world view is...

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