This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

This Is An Expository Essay On The Short Story "Wyoming: The Solace Of Open Spaces," By Gretel Erlich. The Essay Is About How People In Wyoming Are Like Compared To People Who Live In The City.

1095 words - 4 pages

Wyoming, not just a barren state, but the home of a community"The solitude in which westerners live makes them quiet" (Erlich 209), but this does not mean they hide from human contact, for example, the people of Wyoming. There people, in one way or another, keep in contact with each other and they keep in touch with reality. In the short story, "Wyoming: The Solace of Open Spaces," Gretel Erlich writes about the tight community in Wyoming. Although they are separated geographically, they are not isolated individuals, they are far from isolated. Wyomingites make an effort to know and exchange a few words with one another, communication is very important. They are always welcoming and open to strangers who are in need of some help or service, no matter how you look or where you are from. Also, there is little distraction for Wyomingites to wander away from their community. It's so desolate there is nothing for you to do but converse with the people in your community. In addition, these people are in touch with reality and know what is important in life, they do not dwell on insignificant materials. By stating these factors, Gretel Erlich convinces the reader that Wyomingites are not isolated individuals, but members of a community.One factor is that the people of Wyoming are always finding ways to know and communicate with each other. Erlich spent time in Wyoming and said, " and despite the physical separation, people stay in tough, often driving two to three hours to another ranch for dinner" (208). Although these people live far away from each other they still consider each other like a neighbor. To us, city people, a neighbor isthe person that lives right next to you house. To Wyomingites, a neighbor is not just a person living ten feet away from your house. A neighbor is a friend living in their community. These neighbors are people who they trust and care for. They think it is important that they keep in contact with each other, no matter the separationWyomingites are also friendly and approachable people, always there to lend a helping hand to a person in need or to just flash a smile and say hello. Erlich stated, " friendliness is a tradition, strangers passing on the road wave hello" (209). A wave or just even a glance is a rarity in cities. Everyone minds their own business, but Wyomingites are different, they make an effort to be kind. These people are so friendly that there are times where two truckers are seen on the road, having as nice conversation and sharing the coffee from their thermos. They are also very open and kind to strangers. Erlich had said, "if you were traveling, desperado or not, any lighted ranch house was a welcome sign" (209). Even if these strangers can be potential criminals, Wyomingites do not care because to them, that stranger is another friend, a potential community member.In Wyoming, there is little distraction for Wyomingites to stray from their community. For Erlich's stay in Wyoming, " one of [their]...

Find Another Essay On This is an expository essay on the short story "Wyoming: The Solace of Open Spaces," by Gretel Erlich. The essay is about how people in Wyoming are like compared to people who live in the city.

This essay is about the short story "the test"

762 words - 3 pages it shouldn't be accepted. Given the times (1940's), Mrs. Ericson would have risked quite a bit (status, friends, acceptance) had she stood up for Marian; however I believe that is part of what teaching is all about.I believe that people are still fighting in this societal war. Going against the mass majority of your peers is never easy; however when a child is involved, the consequences are trivial. Mrs. Ericson failed Marian is so many ways. Pre-service teachers, who read this story, should take away the importance of supporting your students. Every student deserves to feel believed in.

This essay is about overpopulation and how it effects the people, the environment and the individual. This essay is 20 pages in length and is very extensive

7418 words - 30 pages OverpopulationThe Book of Genesis tells the story of creation of man. God said to man, "befruitful and increase in numbers; fill the earth and subdue it." Prior to thenineteenth century, it was believed that God would provide for those who cameinto the world (Day 101). But, in 1798, this view was shaken by Thomas Malthus'An Essay on the Principle of Population, in which he concluded that whilepopulation increases geometrically, agricultural

This is an essay about how the media and different people have profited from the tragedy of September 11, 2001

1602 words - 6 pages the simple message that bad things had happened to good people, good people were helping, and we were still here. Television channels ran and re-ran horrific images of the planes, the crashes, the towers collapsing now also ran interviews with experts on how to talk to your children about this crisis, and how to manage stress (msnbc, news).As it is now well past the anniversary of this event we find that Rudolph Giuliani had a lot on his plate

An essay on a short story from the "riverside reader". This essay is a responce to the short story Harrison Bergeron By Kurt Vonnegut

737 words - 3 pages Vonnegut and forced him to develop it into a short story. Those who are familiar with Kurt Vonnegut's writing will certainly recognize some other themes of this story. For example the fear of de-humanization of human beings, being stuck in amber (Harrisons inability to overthrow the system) and so forth. In "Harrison Bergeron", Kurt Vonnegut presented a scary view of a future society, where everyone was equal. "Nobody was smarter than anybody else

We Are All One People. This is an essay about how it doesn't matter who you are or what you think you are, that when tragedy happens we are all the same

601 words - 2 pages hotel. I noticed the long lines of people waiting for a phone.A reporter then said that a plane had gone into the Pentagon and that one was on its way to the White House. This is when I noticed the difference in the room starting to shift. I noticed all these "professionals" that are usually so distant began to change. Oddly enough they began to merge closer and started to put one arm through another and slip arms around the next person to them

This essay is based on a short story called "the Edge" by R.K. Narayan. It is about how he was a product of his environment

584 words - 2 pages This essay is about a character named Ranga from "The Edge" by R.K. Narayan. Ranga was a product of his environment; being born into poverty he never really had a chance to be successful. He stayed in an abandoned building called Krishna's Hall while he worked at his knife sharpening business. He was a hard worker and did his best to bring home enough rupee's to maintain a living for his daughter and rather 'difficult' wife. He sharpened knives

This is an essay called "The Peach Tree" which is a story about a personal epiphany like one found in the writings of James Joyce

1275 words - 5 pages in America. We got on the metro and rode for over an hour when we got to Rouen, we got off the train and walked up one of the streets greeting people as we passed by and looking into the shop windows. We came to a place where the front of the building was all open and there were rows of video games along a wall. We looked around and saw that they were mostly all used and outdated games, and were walking out when we met a French boy who was about

This essay is entitled "the way of learning". it is an essay about how people learn and uses some quotes from the book "Siddhartha"

1351 words - 5 pages previous knowledge from the past teachers. "Fasting, waiting, thinking," are some examples of how he is about to go about and try to encounter things on this own, because he has all this previous knowledge. "Siddhartha now also realized why he had struggled in vain with this Self when he was a Brahmin and an ascetic... Now he understood it and realized that the inward voice had been right, that no teacher could have brought him salvation"(99). When he

This essay explores how different people cope with the world they live in

508 words - 2 pages Everyone develops their own way of coping with or explaining the world they live in. The Navajo Origin Legend, Journal of the First Voyage to America, and To My Dear and Loving Husband are all examples of how different people dealt with and made sense of their surroundings. In order to cope with their world, Native Americans told myths, Christopher Columbus compared his discoveries to what he was familiar with, and Anne Bradstreet wrote

This essay is about the Canadian confederation in 1867. It describes all the people involved, what happened, why it happened, how it happened and so on

840 words - 3 pages was for the colonies to come together to form one country. These are the problems that led to Confederation:Political problemsThe Province of Canada had the most people and was later made into the provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The government of the Province of Canada did not run very well because the English-speaking and French-speaking sides - who were pretty much equal halves - had different ideas about how things should be run. Leaders from

This essay is called "to build or not to build" it is talking about the log house in the short story "shiloh" by Bobbie Ann Manson. it is 4 pages and includes themes of love and marriage

944 words - 4 pages taking the time to ask, Leroy does not understand why Norma Jean would not want to live in this log house. He never reveals the true reason of why he wants to build this house; however, it is clearly obvious that he believes that it would be the key to saving their marriage. Despite Leroy's strong determination to build this log house, his wife on the other hand, has extremely contradicting wishes.Norma Jean is a very unhappy woman, she wants to

Similar Essays

Jackie Robinson And The Civil Rights This Is A Short Essay About Jackie Robinson And How He Was One Of The First Black People To Be In Sports. It Talks About How He Influenced Many People

315 words - 2 pages color barrier inbaseball, but if you focus on the totality of Jackie Robinson and all that he accomplished,you will see much more. He became a fundraiser for NAACP and served on the Board ofdirectors. He also did many other fundraisers. Martin Luther King Jr. eve said, "JackieRobinson made it possible for me in the first place. Without him, I would have neverbeen able to do what I did." This is why Jackie Robinson made the biggest impact onCivil Rights.

Loyalty In "The Count Of Monte Cristo" By Alexander Dumas. This Essay Is About The Loyal And Unloyal People In The Story

1803 words - 7 pages actions of the loyal in this novel are all done with little or no regard for the doers own wellbeing or happiness. When Dantès is imprisoned on false charges of being a Bonapartist, Monsieur Morrel, who is Dantès' employer, repeatedly attempts to clear his name and risks imprisonment himself on suspicions of being a Bonapartist. When Dantès pretends to have serious injuries on the Isle of Monte Cristo, Jacopo, the smuggler who

This Is A Short Essay About The Character Flaws In "The Tragedy Of Romeo And Juliet". It Show The Flaws Of 3 Different People Who Had Crucial Parts In The Play

832 words - 3 pages Character Flaws of "Romeo and Juliet"Romeo and Juliet is one of Shakespeare's plays about tragedy. It is about two lovers who commit suicide when their family rivalries prevent them from being together. The play has many characters, each with its own role in keeping the plot line. Some characters have very little to do with the plot. Many characters do not have much time on stage but their parts are crucial to the plot of the story. Some of the

This Is An Essay Written About The Prohibition Law And How It Effected People Park City High School/ Us History Essay

491 words - 2 pages efficiency. Many claimed that the people who drank beer were “Traitors to the country.” Over the course of the twenties the government struggled to enforce this law locally and federally. In rural areas the law was strictly enforced but in urban, more populated areas the law was not direct nor successfully enforced. Many found ways around the law, taking advantage of illegally manufacturing alcohol, also known as bootlegging. Along with