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This Rhetorical Comparison Essay Between Edwards, "Sinners In The Hands Of An Angry God," And Jefferson's, "The Declaration Of Independence.

612 words - 2 pages

Persuading people doesn't have to mean that it has to be done in one unique way. This rhetorical comparison essay between Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," and Jefferson's, "The Declaration of Independence," shows two different ways of persuading people through great techniques of English writing. The sentence from Edwards sermon and the opening sentence of the Declaration of Independence both include many points such as the tone, diction, syntax, imagery, rhetorical structure, figurative language. The points shown through the opening of Jefferson's Declaration aims through the effects of these points to obtain the attention of the audience. However, the sentence, "The flood's of God's vengeance have been withheld; but your guilt in the meantime is constantly increasing...." From the Edwards sermon, states reasons through these points to procure his motive to his congregation that has gathered about. Both sentences are arranged in such syntax that both very well appeal to the listeners. Also, both speakers have the same motive to persuade the people they address.Edwards purpose was to convert the non-believers of Christ in his congregation, by using God as his supportive argument to obtain the audiences attention, to go deep into the people's emotions and fill them fear. "There is nothing but the mere pleasure of God that hold's the waters back...."(Edwards). Within this sentence, Edwards the speaker captivates his audiences attention through his harsh, harmful and threatening tone of voice.Jefferson's purpose for the Declaration of Independence was to declare freedom from Britain. "...A decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation...." (Jefferson). The opening sentence of the Declaration of Independence has a much different approach to procure the audiences...

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