Thoughts On Marriage In Nineteenth Century Europe

1727 words - 7 pages

In the aftermath of the dual revolution, European society underwent vast changes spanning all aspects of society. Political ideologies began to evolve congruently with changes that were occurring across the continent. Various conservative, liberal, and utopian viewpoints emerged, critiquing the new modern society. The critiques encompassed all aspects of society, including the ideas of marriage and family. Three prominent intellectual figures that proposed differing ideas on marriage were Louis de Bonald, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, and Charles Fourier. All three came from various positions on the political spectrum; Bonald was conservative, Hegel a liberal, and Fourier a utopian socialist. Coming from different ideological backgrounds, their ideas on society, marriage, and family differed greatly.
The purpose of marriage to Bonald was to unite the opposite sexes in order to reproduce, with the end result being a family. He viewed the family as the basis of all society; marriage and the creation of the family were the key ingredients to the foundation on which society was to build itself upon, and continue to operate. Bonald contended, “The production and conservation of man are thus the purpose of the family, and the reason for all relationships of sex and age which constitute it.” (Bonald, 126). With this statement, he made clear that reproduction was the sole purpose of marriage, never placing any emphasis on the happiness or pleasure of the two spouses. Once the family was created, Bonald argued that the bonds the family built were not out of natural compassion, rather that they were learned. He did not see man as naturally obtaining the ability to maintain and cherish their position in the family, rather he learned them through the capability of reason – namely through the guidance of religion, and the force of law.
Bonald was adamantly opposed to the idea of divorce. He looked at the issue from both the domestic side, as well as the public side. With the goal of marriage clearly defined, Bonald still saw no use for divorce even if the man and woman were failing to produce a child. As Bonald argued, “Marriage is a potential society, the family an actual society. Nature has not set a term on this potential.” (Bonald, 128). What Bonald was trying to get across, was that that there was no guarantee on when one would conceive a child, and that breaking a marriage due to the fact that it was taking longer than anticipated was wrong. He believed that there was no guarantee that the second marriage would result in the conceiving of a child, therefore, there was no need to nullify the first.
Bonald believed that marriage, when terminated, was almost always against the will of one spouse. He gave the example that when a woman enters a marriage, she enters with her dignity and fertility, the man with his authority. When the man asks, – and is eventually granted the divorce through law – the wife is left without her dignity or fertility, and...

Find Another Essay On Thoughts on Marriage in Nineteenth-Century Europe

The Global Domination by Europe before the Nineteenth Century

2155 words - 9 pages their presence in Mexico in a short amount of time.In the period from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century, Europe and its influence on almost all global affairs is a blueprint that many nations tried to follow but few succeeded. The culture hearth that began as a modest array of pastoral nomads became a burgeoning world power that used all of its advantages to play its part as "center of the earth". In the studying of Europe's success

Account for the centrality of ancient sculpture to the canon of art in Western Europe between the Renaissance and the early nineteenth century.

1240 words - 5 pages assumptions about theideals of classical art, which in turn "brought a significant development in taste and inthe concept of the canon" (B1, p48)In conclusion, this essay has selected only a few sources of evidence to account for thecentrality of ancient sculpture to the canon of art in Western Europe between theRenaissance and the early nineteenth century. The arrival of the Parthenon marblespresented a new approach to understanding classical art

'Industrialisation depended largely on more efficient transport systems.' Discuss this view on the growing industrialisation on nineteenth-century Europe.

564 words - 2 pages traffic as well as horse-drawn road to transport raw materials were widely use. The coming of railway system and the steam-powered vessels only shortened the transportation time and made it more efficient. Thirdly, industrialisation also depended on other factors such as the role of the government, the improvement in technology, the banking system, the infrastructure and the level of education besides the efficient transport system.In the growing

Opera in the Nineteenth Century

999 words - 4 pages How would feel if you were in the La Scala opera house, listening to a Vincenzo Bellini operas. Would it be warm felt or just would be nice to be there. To know that there is people out there that can sing with the power and flexibility that they can do. Vincenzo Bellini is one of the many opera composers that the nineteenth century had to offer (The National Opera Center America). Bellini like many of the composers in this time was born in

Emancipation In The "long Nineteenth Century"

1549 words - 6 pages from a particular restraint. In the long nineteenth century there were indeed many restraints on society and the individual, many of which were loosened to various extents. Controls of government, property, religion and culture were changed. Indeed so were the borders of many countries. "Europe was racing towards democracy". An Enlightened Despot such as Joseph II of Austria was seen to take a liberating stance when it came to the peasant

"Folk" Resistance in the Nineteenth Century

1007 words - 4 pages Latin America in the nineteenth century was a time that was not well documented for the lower class. In fact, the only references to the culture of the lower class or "folk" were from oral history, poems, elite writings about the folk society, and from secondary sources. One source Poverty of Progress, by E. Bradford Burns, captures the ideals and thoughts of the folk culture in Latin America during the nineteenth century as well as the people's

The Awakening: Sexuality in Nineteenth Century Literature

1499 words - 6 pages advanced in theme over other nineteenth century works. Her piece more closely reflects the modern novel. Chopin gives her readers the story of a married woman, Edna Pontellier, as she explores her sexuality and need for emotional intimacy outside her marriage. Edna's need for extramarital relationships challenged the nineteenth century ideas of femininity and propriety. In the past, literature for women strove to reinforce the culturally approved

Nineteenth Century Industrialization in the United States

1464 words - 6 pages Nineteenth Century Industrialization in the United States During the second half of the nineteenth century, the United States experienced an urban revolution unparalleled in world history up to that point in time. As factories, mines, and mills sprouted out across the map, cities grew up around them. The late nineteenth century, declared an economist in 1889, was “not only the age of cities, but the age of great cities.” Between 1860

The American Dream in the Nineteenth Century

1011 words - 4 pages In the late nineteenth century, an increasingly flow of immigrants from many parts of the world made their way to America searching for a dream that gave birth to term “American Dream” still alive today. Driven by economic and financial hardships, persecutions, and great social and political turmoil of the nineteenth century, millions of people and families left their homelands and embarked on the difficult journey to the United States of

Importance of Patriarchy in the Nineteenth Century

1585 words - 6 pages The status of married women in nineteenth- and twentieth-century peasant societies is a field of study that is currently being nourished by a number of major theories, questions and hypotheses. In relation to them, our essay seeks to outline a model of the male/female relationship in the rural parts of the Saguenay region during the settlement period. The time frame extends from 1860--by which time some 20 parishes had been opened--until the

Nineteenth Century Education in Jane Eyre

1689 words - 7 pages Nineteenth Century Education in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte was born in Yorkshire in 1816. She spent most of her life in Haworth, a bleak Yorkshire village where her father was curate. In 1821 her mother died, so she, her four sisters, Elizabeth, Anne, Maria and Emily and her brother Branwell were sent to live with their Aunt, Elizabeth Branwell. In 1824 Charlotte was sent with Elizabeth, Maria and Emily to a school

Similar Essays

Was Increased Expenditure On Educational Provision In Nineteenth Century Europe A Sound Investment?

2553 words - 10 pages present whether the increased investment had a positive or negative impact on the education system for all layers of society.The general education system comprises primary and secondary education. In nineteenth century Europe however, primary education was predominant in terms of access and attendance. Elementary school was open for everybody and was even an obligation in several European countries.For example in the year 1717 compulsory education

Nineteenth Century Europe: Autonomy And Responsibility

1533 words - 6 pages Nineteenth Century Europe: Autonomy and Responsibility In the nineteenth century, many changes were occurring throughout Europe. Many of these changes focused on the individual, which was an important aspect of European society. However, many changes also focused on the individuals responsibility to the nation. During this time, many individuals demonstrated their right to self-government through political systems such as liberalism

Global Domination Of Europe Before The Nineteenth Century

2162 words - 9 pages tolerance allowed them to conquer and establish their presence in Mexico in a short amount of time.In the period from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century, Europe and its influence on almost all global affairs is a blueprint that many nations tried to follow but few succeeded. The culture hearth that began as a modest array of pastoral nomads became a burgeoning world power that used all of its advantages to play its part as "centre of the

Global Domination Of Europe Before The Nineteenth Century

2164 words - 9 pages tolerance allowed them to conquer and establish their presence in Mexico in a short amount of time.In the period from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century, Europe and its influence on almost all global affairs is a blueprint that many nations tried to follow but few succeeded. The culture hearth that began as a modest array of pastoral nomads became a burgeoning world power that used all of its advantages to play its part as "centre of the