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Title: The Comparison Of Portrayal Of Miss Havisham In 'great Expectations' And Boo Radley In 'to Kill A Mockingbird'

2197 words - 9 pages

The comparison of portrayal of Miss Havisham in 'Great Expectations' and Boo Radley in 'To Kill a Mockingbird''To Kill a Mockingbird' was published in 1960 by Harper Lee, whereas Great Expectations was published in 1861. The author (Charles Dickens) died in 1870, but Harper Lee is still yet living. 'To Kill a Mockingbird' is set in the 1930's, "Maycomb was an old town". The indication that Maycomb is set in the 1930's, is the racism around, the discrimination of blacks to white is a great deal larger than it has become. It is a first person novel, the narrator is Scout, she tells the story of the past, and everything she went through. She is the narrator and protagonist of the story. In comparison 'Great Expectations' is set in mid-nineteenth century. It is set in early Victorian England, a time when great social changes were sweeping the nation, there was division between the rich and the poor, similarly in To Kill a Mockingbird, and there was a division between blacks and whites. The setting place is Kent and London, England. Similarly, the point of view is a first person, the narrator is Pip. He tells his life story in past tense too. Naturally the plot precludes total honesty at every stage of the narrative; at least, if the narrator is not actually dishonest he chooses to remain silent at certain crucial points. For example, the ambiguous dialogue between Pip and Miss Havisham near the end of chapter nineteen mislead the reader as Pip himself was misled, though on re-reading it becomes clear that the reader's deductions have been as hastily and ill founded as Pip's own: the suggestion also is mainly contained in the dialogue and in the fanciful comparison of Miss Havisham to a fairy godmother, rather than in narrative comment.The mad, vengeful Miss Havisham, a wealthy dowager who lives in a rotting mansion and wears an old wedding dress everyday of her life, is not exactly a believable character, because it is unusual for someone to sit for such a long time, leaving everything exactly how it was years ago, refusing to get on with life just because she experienced something bad, she wants to remember this for the rest of her life, but she is certainly one of the most memorable creations in the book. Similarly Boo Radley is known as a "menace" and "mental man". He is a "male volent phantom", the residents said he went out at night when the moon was down and peeped through windows, and that Mr Radley kept him chained to the bed. In this way, by having an unusual character that is oppressed and pre-judged by the local people in a novel, might enhance the meaning of the book."She was dressed in rich materials; satins and lace, silks- all of white, she had a long white veil dependant from her hair, she had bridal flowers in her hair, but her hair was white. Some bright jewels sparkled on her neck and hands, and some other jewels on the table". This is a description of Miss Havisham by Pip, he describes her as it is actually a wedding day, but it...

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