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Title Vii Of The Civil Rights Act Of 1964

888 words - 4 pages

This paper is designed to help you better understand how the employment discrimination process works. I will discuss the process of filing a charge of employment discrimination under Title VII with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) as well as the process for civil litigation within the legal system.IntroductionJohn is an employee in a private sector organization and falls victim of discrimination by his employer under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This paper discusses the process and steps John must follow to pursue a claim against his employer.Equal Employment Opportunity CommissionThe Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was developed to help any individual who believes that his/her employment rights have been violated. The EEOC deals with most matters of employment discrimination arising under a variety of federal statutes, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of an employee or applicant's age, gender, race, national origin, sex, disability, pregnancy, or religion. This federal law is knows as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The EEOC ProcessIt's important to understand that an aggrieved employee, such as John, cannot take his case straight to court. Due to the massive number of employment disputes, Congress requires that all such charges be filed first with the EEOC. Generally, an employee must file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC within 180 days from the date of the alleged violation. John can file a charge by mail or in person at the nearest EEOC office. These charges are fairly short and would require John to provide basic information about himself and his employer, as well as a brief description of the alleged violation, including the specific date(s) it took place.Once this charge has been filed, the employer will then be notified within 10 days by the local EEOC office of the charges brought against them. At this time, the EEOC may seek to settle a charge by encouraging the employer to mediate the dispute. If mediation efforts are declined, the investigation continues. During the course of investigation, written statements may be obtained, interviews of personnel, document review, or on-site investigations may be performed.Once all evidence has been collected, the EEOC will determine whether their findings prove there is reasonable cause that the employer violated the law. If the evidence establishes that discrimination has occurred, John and his employer will be informed of this in a letter of determination that explains the finding. At this point, the EEOC will attempt to have the John and his employer conciliate the matter to develop a remedy for the discrimination. This process of mediation is offered as an alternative to the lengthy litigation process. It's a...

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