To What Extent Did The Spread Of Christianity Violate Human Rights And Freedom In Africa? By Walubo Jude Tadeo

1919 words - 8 pages

subjugation of Africans, Coloureds and Indians for the sake of South Africa. Christian Missionaries based their principles and programmes on doctrines of racial superiority, relegated Africans to a second race, denying then the human respect.

Christian missionaries never at one time had any respect for the religious freedom of Africans who practiced Traditional religion. They regarded Christianity and Traditional African religions as an equal and worked hard to eliminate them. There was a secret agreement on the practice of mission in Africa. Christian missionaries did not try so much to convert Muslims, and Muslims didn't work hard to convert Christians - as they already belong to a faith. Followers of traditional African religions, on the other hand, constituted the contested missionary fields, as they still were regarded not "belong to a faith". They were seen as "heathens" - a term still widely used by Christian missionaries. This contravenes the Universal Right to Religious Freedom.

To entrench and defend such White dominance, the Christians set about policies that would block Africans from gaining consciousness of the operation of religion denying them the right to and question religious information. It is on record for example that catholic converts were not allowed to read the Bible. Christianity was therefore not deviation of a well-intentioned undertaking that went horribly wrong. Neither was it, as we were later told, an attempt to stave off the "evil of slave trade" Its ideological underpinning and the programmes set in motion constituted a deliberate and systematic mission of a ruling clique that saw itself as the champion of a "super-race".

It is necessary to note that the Christianity era was preceded by a sustained period of dispossession, denial, and subordination. The process of evangelization in Africa lasted for over two centuries; from the destruction of communities in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, through the Education system, to the disunity among brothers created in the nineteenth century.

In the schools established by Christian missionaries, languages for instruction, the lingua franca, discouraged the use of any African language as a national language. In their insistence on the use of the lingua franca, the colonial governments to which Christian missionaries were party, created a state of illiteracy among the African people (Boahen, Ajayi, and Tidy 1986, 133). Where once the people had thrived in the valued traditions of their culture, they were now transformed into a state of deprivation.

In the economic spheres of life, the spread of Christianity impoverished African because of the numerous church demands such as tithe and even disillusioning statements like "Happy are poor" that the missionaries used. This left Africans beggars with low standards of living yet the it is a...

Find Another Essay On To What extent did the spread of Christianity violate Human Rights and Freedom in Africa? By Walubo Jude Tadeo

UNIVERSAL SECONDARY EDUCATION (USE) CAN BE A BLESSING TO LEARNERS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN UGANDA By Walubo Jude Tadeo Makerere University Kampala Uganda - East Africa

2340 words - 9 pages As government makes a shift to Universal Secondary with priority to students with disabilities, policy makes including educational institutions, in the cabinet and at parliamentary level should focus on some of the following suggestions to make the policy a success.They should account for the training of secondary education teachers in Special...

HOW COLONIALISM UNDER-DEVELOPED UGANDA By Walubo Jude Tadeo, Makerere University Kampala Uganda - East Africa

4668 words - 19 pages Under development is the failure of a country to rich maturity.(WW.Rostows) Afro centric scholars have traced the roots of the present state of poverty and misery in Uganda way back to the early days of imposition of British rule who established a dis-articulated economy. Rodney (1981) stresses the negative social, economic, and environmental impacts of the colonial period when he states: "The only positive development in colonialism was when...

19th Century Jihads and social justice, security and prosperity. By Walubo Jude Tadeo Makerere University - Kampala Uganda e-mail : jwalubo@yahoo.com

1498 words - 6 pages The Jihads in the 19th century West Africa were a series of revolutions or holy wars that characterized the history of the region sweeping from 1804 in Hausa land, 1818 in Masina and 1815 in Futa Jallon area under the leadership of Uthman Dan Fodio, Seku Ahmadu and Al-Hajj Umar respectively because of the un fair conditions in society. These wars were intended...

To what extent did southern commitment to states' rights weaken the Confederates in the Civil War?

2718 words - 11 pages To what extent did southern commitment to states' rights weaken the Confederates in the Civil War?The reasons for the secession of southern states that led to the American Civil War were based largely on their belief and ideas of state rights (or "states rights," a variant that came into use after the war). This exalted the powers of the individual...

To what extent did Kennedy and Johnson improve Civil Rights of African Americans?

1333 words - 5 pages IntroThis essay will show how these two presidents tackled the problem of Civil rights of African Americans and it will demonstrate the extent of improvements and what remained the same. When one compares the extent of improvements which these two presidents make, the immediate reaction would be one praise towards President Kennedy because of his ultimate death while one would demonise President Johnson cause of Vietnam. This essay will...

To what extent did the Federal Government contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

1358 words - 5 pages Sophie-mae BolgerMr Foley4/11/14How much of a driving force was the Federal Government behind progress towards racial equality in the years 1945 - 1968?The federal government was a strong driving force behind progress, but certain administrations made more progress towards racial equality, I believe the Johnson administration was one of the strongest forces because he dealt with issues on a national scale and the...

To what extent has DNA technology helped our understanding of human colonisation and the spread of agriculture in Europe over the past 10 000 years? How is this supported by language evidence?

1741 words - 7 pages Although the focus of this essay is to discuss how DNA technology helped our understanding of human colonisation and the spread of agriculture in Europe over the past 10 000 years, it will first look at the recent African origin theory as it is relevant to show how modern humans arrived in Europe in the first place. As later...

"To what extent had african americans acheived equal civil rights by 1940?" A reviw of the civil rights and treatment of blacks in pre-civil-war America.

973 words - 4 pages To What Extent Had African Americans Achieved Equal Civil Rights by 1940?The civil rights of black Americans have improved greatly since the first pioneersof the civil rights movement began their quest for equality. Though most people associateblack civil rights with the radical movements of the 1950's and 60's, the African Americanfight for equal human rights had actually begun almost two hundred years...

What events, from 1937 to 1939, led to the outbreak of war in 1939, and how did war spread between 1937 and 1941?

969 words - 4 pages France and Britain declared war on Germany in 1939 and by 1941 a global war had began. The events in Europe which lead to the outbreak of war were the Munich Crisis, Anschluss, the invasion of Poland and the German-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact. The war spread because Germany invaded and occupied countries, they launched Operation...

The Spread of Christianity and Islam

1373 words - 5 pages A strange historical significance seems to surround the Middle East. It has served as the birth place for many cultures and religions. Its Fertile Crescent contained one of the earliest culture hearths where civilization developed. In this area great kingdoms of the ancient world, such as Babylon and Persia, arose to shape history. Judaism had its roots in the Middle East, and Israel--the country of God's chosen people--was formed here. Later...

The Spread of Buddhism and Christianity

1545 words - 6 pages The Spread of Buddhism and Christianity Buddhism and Christianity were each founded by one person, and then eventually grew into two of the largest religions in the world. Each religion had different reasons for the success in the spreading of each respected belief. Although both faced many hardships, the two religions overcame and prevailed through their problems and continued to find ways to attract new believers every day. ...

Similar Essays

Politics Of Socrates, Plato And Aristotle By Walubo Jude Tadeo

990 words - 4 pages Socrates, Plato and Aristotle had virtually the same beliefs about man's relation to the State, although Plato's political theory of the State was more rational than Socrates or

A Comparison Between The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights And The 1995 Uganda Constitution By Walubo Jude Tadeo, Makerere University, Kampala Uganda. 2005

4043 words - 16 pages The Universal Declaration of human Rights shares a lot in common with the Ugandan constitution. "The 1995 constitution gives hope for enjoyment of Human Rights and governance compared to its predicessors"1 Below is a survey into the relationship between the two documents. It should be noted however that there are both similarities and differences. Many Ugandan laws, as well as some sections in the Constitution, contravene the provisions of the...

Trace The Causes And Development Of Ethinicity In Uganda. By Walubo Jude Tadeo, Makere University, Kampala Uganda

9669 words - 39 pages The genesis of the ethnic crisis in Uganda, as in most parts of Africa, is mainly linked to the colonial intervention process and the particular organisation of power in society. The post-colonial practices simply enhanced it. Therefore, the formation of ethnic identities is a social construction defined by the historical conditions in which they emerge. Ethnicity is not a...

Ethinicity In Uganda Root Causes And Growth By Walubo Jude Tadeo Makerere University, Kampala

9767 words - 39 pages One of the post-independence political concerns in Uganda today is that ethnicity had been detrimental to national unity, democracy and development. There is no doubt that the conflicts in Uganda from 1964 to 1966 when Prime Minister Milton Obote overthrew President Edward Mutesa, have taken on an ethnic expression. The 1971 coup by Idi Amin, the civil war of...