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To Kill A Criminal: The Morals Behind The Classic To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

693 words - 3 pages

"Let the dead bury the dead." This quote from the Classic American novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, sums up what we will be talking about today. My understanding of this quote is that what's done is done, one man is dead for no good reason, but the one who killed him is with him in death. No harm, no foul. But is this really right? The first thing we need to look at is the actual problem, then the question posed. So without further ado, I present my essay:

To Kill a Criminal: The Morals Behind a Classic

The problem: A disgusting creature by the name of Bob Ewell claimed that a colored man assaulted and raped his 19 year old daughter, bruising and hurting her badly. He demanded justice for this crime, which he pronounced was a hanging. The father of our main character, Atticus, was the defending lawyer in the case. He proved well and thoroughly that the young colored man, Tom, was innocent of the crime. Not only that, but he proved that the perpetrator was none other than the girls father, Bob Ewell. Unfortunately, Tom did not believe that this was enough to release him from imprisonment, and tried to run free. During the whole mess, the poor man was shot to death. Even though no harm was done to himself, Ewell vowed to "get back" at Atticus for what he did, the heinous deed of defending an innocent man. Ewell came through on his promise. A while after this incident, Atticuses children, Jem and Scout, were at a school function during the evening. Skipping the details, they eventually walked home by themselves. Alone. At night. In the dark. As we all knew would happen, Ewell decided it was high time to bring vengeance down on Atticus through his weakest point; his children. Ewell snuck up on the kids in the cover of darkness, holding a sharp blade at the ready. Suddenly, he grabbed Scout! Jem held on to scout and tried to pull her away, and...

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