To Kill A Mocking Bird Essay

839 words - 3 pages

CMN 203INDEPENDENT UNIVERSITY, BANGLADESHCourse Instructor : Raisa RasheekaMd . Nazmul Hassan ShohanID : 1110239Sec : 2Choose one of the major characters and write about that character , using specific details from the book to support your analysis . What kind of person in this character ? How does this character fit into the action of the plot ? Does this character seem real ? If this character were real , how would you relate to her / him ?In " To Kill A Mocking Bird " book may be Scout Finch or Atticus Finch are the major characters but I think Jem Finch is the major character here . Jem is Scouts elder brother . And Jem is Scout's primary source of knowledge and he takes responsibility for her in most instances . Here Jem grows as older , he finds it difficult to deal with the hypocrisy and cruelty of people , but Atticus another major character helps him work though some of that disappointment . Here Atticus tells Scout that Jem simply needs time to process what he has become ! The strong presence of Atticus in Jem's life seems to promise that he will recover his equilibrium when the profit and loss are value (0) zero .Later in his life Jem is able to watch that Boo Redley's unexpected and indicates is good in people . And The idea that Jem resolves his cynicism and moves toward a happier life is supported by the beginning of the novel, in which a grown-up Scout remembers talking to Jem about the events that make up the novel's plot. So that , this character seems like real .Choose a very exciting or significant event in your book and explain that event , telling what happened and why that event was important in the book . How did the author help you experience the event as though it were really happening ? Be specific .I thing a significant event in this book when ... Finch family is the talk of the town because of Atticus defending Tom Robinson. One day, Scout tries to ask Atticus what rape is, Atticus refuses to explain what it is. Then Scout asks Atticus why Calpurnia wouldn't explain it to her. Then it lead to Scout asking if they could go to Calpurnia's church but Aunt Alexandra interrupted her and told her she can't. Then Scout started to be rude to her but Atticus made her apologize to her Aunt. That night, Jem tells Scout not to get in Aunt...

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