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Education In Maycomb In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

814 words - 3 pages

In the average person’s life education is everything and is shown everywhere, even in places you would not expect to find it. Education is important for life in today’s average society because if you do not have an education you most likely would not get a high paying job or no job at all because education is needed for almost everything. In the book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Education in Maycomb is showed by many people and is interpreted to Scout, Jem and Dill in many ways even though it is flawed and sometimes backwards in most cases. Other ways education is taught throughout the book is moral; school and through their dad which effected scout the greatest through the book.

Once scout reaches the minimum age of going to school she thinks that school will be great and easy but when she arrives she knows that it will be the exact opposite when she finds out a new teacher is teaching her. Ms. Caroline teaches only her way which makes the education system flawed since most students learn different ways and not just the way a teacher thinks her students should learn. Ms. Caroline says “Your father does not know how to teach. You can have a seat now.” (Lee, 17). This is said on the first day Scout goes to school. This shows that Ms. Caroline’s way of teaching discriminates against how Scout has learned to read. Ms. Caroline is narrow minded when it comes to teaching and does not get the ways of the small town. Also she does not know that the kids there are intelligent and that the kids are used to a harsher environment which leads to no education being taught to the kids at all throughout the book. This means that throughout the book little is taught to Scout in school but mostly by her father and her surroundings.

Getting taught in school is not the only thing that affected scout throughout the book. Another way she was affected was by the moral teachings of Atticus. If she was not taught by Atticus she would have different point of views of everything and everyone. Scout would be leading a whole different life of racism and misbeliefs of people if Atticus did not parent her the way that he did. Atticus says “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his...

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