To What Extent Are Humanity's Interactions With The Natural Environment Reflected In Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" And Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner"?

1783 words - 7 pages

Aldous Huxley's satirical novel "Brave New World", written in the aftermath of World War I, and Ridley Scott's science fiction film, "Blade Runner", made in the 1980s, both reflect a society having undergone major technological advancements, so much so that they are totally disconnected with the natural world. These texts do not significantly reflect the interaction of humanity with the natural environment to a great extent, but it is this lack that emphasises the issues present within the two texts, of mass production and consumerism, that man is enslaved by technology, and the consequences of abolishing nature.Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World in the 1920's when the power of the media was rapidly expanding, and mass production was on the rise. Motion pictures had become popular entertainment, and Henry Ford had initiated the industrial revolution with his first T-Model car. The novel expresses Huxley's fears about the possible future of such a society. These are inherent in Brave New World, and are fleshed out in the way of life the population has adopted, particularly their consistent daily cycle, as 'the crowds' that 'daily left London to play Electro-magnetic golf or tennis' or go 'to the feelies'. Huxley emphasises the consumerist nature of the world state through the population's lack of morals, symbolised by the hypnopaedic phrase 'everyone belongs to everyone else'. This attitude not only scandalised Huxley's contemporaries, but greatly dehumanises every individual in BNW as the concern of mass consumption is limited not only to food - it includes human beings as well. Huxley creates caricatures in order to emphasise the brainwashing inherent in the World State, but indicates this is not the fault of the general population who are forced by conditioned instinct to act out their lives in a similar way every day. They are displayed as slaves to consumerism, particularly through the hallucinogenic drug soma advertised through word of mouth as 'a gramme is better than a damn'.Like Brave New World, Ridley Scott's film Blade Runner explores the effects of consumerism and mass production on a society. Blade Runner is set in a social context based on that of the 1980s, as technology was rapidly advancing, particularly in computerisation, and a significant rise in the consumption of brand names such as Nike was occurring. Blade Runner is a representation of a possible future, set in 2019, in which Earth has been reduced to an industrialised wasteland, indicated by the opening wide angle shot of a polluted sky filled with a sea of skyscrapers intermittently belching forth flames. The film displays many wide angle shots of the vast sky, most of which look up at it, generating an oppressive atmosphere. The sky is also dominated by large floating ships displaying advertisements 'brought to you by your corporate sponsors', emphasising the consumerism inherent in the society on Earth. In this world, no hint of nature can be seen, other than the...

Find Another Essay On To what extent are humanity's interactions with the natural environment reflected in Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner"?

"Blade Runner" (Ridley Scott) and "Brave New World" (Aldous Huxley)- 'Humanity likes to think of itself as more sophisticated than the wild yet it cannot really escape its need for the natural world'

1736 words - 7 pages Despite different contexts both Aldous Huxley within his book "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott in the film "Blade Runner" explore the idea that humans feel themselves more sophisticated than the natural world, yet are able to completely sever relations between humanity and the nature. Through various techniques both texts warn their varied audiences of the negative ramifications that will come from such disdainful, careless opinions and

Comparitive study of text and context: "Brave New World", written by Aldous Huxley, and "Blade Runner", directed by Ridley Scott.

1148 words - 5 pages "Brave New World", written by Aldous Huxley, and "Blade Runner", directed by Ridley Scott both explore futuristic dystopias. The composers use science fiction, film noir, satire and irony to depict futures which could develop from the issues relevant to their contexts of production. These contexts are integral to the ideas projected within these two texts. Despite being composed 50 years apart both texts deal with similar issues. In particular

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1472 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley's Brave New World I stood in front of the television screen in horror and disbelief at 10 o'clock on September 11, 2001. Watching as the second plane struck the World Trade Center in a fiery ball of destruction, I thought for sure that this world as we know it was coming to an abrupt end. Seeing the first tower fall and then the second, with over 100 stories each now a pile of twisted steel and death made me want to

Happiness in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

708 words - 3 pages the higher castes are taught not to associate with them. Bernard’s hypnopædic lessons did not work as well as most. He sees everything in this artificially manufactured society as dismal, and does not act against it by using soma, a drug to induce a safe hallucination and keep one felicitous. For problems that nature creates, the society of Brave New World destroys them to keep pestering insects and things of that sort from infringing on

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1535 words - 7 pages Theme or Concept Examined in Brave New World Huxley observes in his work, Brave New World that the modern world revolves around technological development. The aspirations and morals of modern society do not entirely rely on social issues such as love, family, and success but rather on industrial progress and social development. According to Huxley, technological improvement and growth are critical factors that shape the operation and activities

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1128 words - 5 pages How valuable is the protection of individuality? In a society dominated by falsified, scientifically manufactured happiness, individuality proves a rarity. Aldous Huxley’s speculative novel, Brave New World, demonstrates the consequences of this type of impassive society. Bernard, Helmholtz, and John are all unique from their peers, and they think individually as a result. Because of their individuality, the group is ultimately banned from

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

771 words - 3 pages tinker with the embryos to produce various grades of human beings, ranging from the super-intelligent Alpha Pluses down to the shorter and dumber semi-moron Epsilons. The story takes place in England where the new society lives. Due to a gigantic biological attack almost all of the world is destroyed except for england and parts of the U.S. In “Brave New World” civilization is controlled by conditioning and hatchery. Everyone is brought into

"Brave New World" and "Blade Runner" Comparison

1054 words - 4 pages humans are able to freely experience both the pleasures and problems of life.This comparative study of 'Brave New World' by Aldous Huxley 932 and 'Blade Runner: Director's Cut' by Ridley Scott (released in 1992, but produced in 1982), will propose that detrimental effects occur as a result of humanity's desire for control.Both texts explore 'In the Wild' where the composers stress the fact that man's relationship with nature has become distorted

Brave new world and blade runner

713 words - 3 pages HOMEBlade Runner and Brave new world SCRAP notes OF notes- human interference with the natural world and the environment- totalitarianism in Brave New World to have strata- imbalance of female influence over the world state- Blade Runner film noir is a parody- Blade Runner reflects a Judeo Christian society- Tyrell is god and creates all the replicates and thus he represents the totalitarian state- Roy = fallen Lucifer, Deckard = angel of death

"Blade Runner" and "Brave New World" in terms of context and man's relationship with nature.

1026 words - 4 pages Society has historically sought control over the natural world. This recurring tendency to pursue science and technology, and through control, to skew and redefine the notion of humanity is evidenced in both Brave New World and Blade Runner, each reflecting the context of their time of production yet dealing with essentially the same themes of science and technology dominating nature, and the dehumanization of society through excessive

Overview of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1543 words - 6 pages In Aldous Huxley's self-created dystopian society, controlled by biotechnology, genetics are edited to perfection and babies are manufactured in bottles through Ectogenesis1. After visiting America in the Roaring Thirties, Huxley admired the confidence, vitality, and "generous extravagance" he found in American life and the American people. However, he began to see the destructive spiral that Totalitarianism had on society, especially with his

Similar Essays

Comparison Of Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" And Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner"

1438 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" are both predominantly science fiction texts, which represent concerns for humanity in the wild. Conversely, these dystopian texts have been composed in largely varying social, cultural and historical contexts, producing differing themes for both the composer and responder. Ultimately, changes in context affect the composer's implicit beliefs as to whether or not the current

Exploring The Depiction Of Humanity And Nature's Relationship In Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" And Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner". Australia Hsc Essay.

1287 words - 5 pages Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's 'Blade Runner":The Director's Cut, despite their very different cultural contexts, depict futuristic societies where the relationship between humanity and nature is divorced, and the technological and artificial have supplanted the natural. The composers of the texts explore the effects of human development on the natural world by utilizing the science fiction genre as a means of social

"Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley, "Blade Runner" By Ridley Scott, In The Wild.

1188 words - 5 pages “In the wild: A significant concern for humanity is its relationship with the natural world and its rhythms. The quality and importance of this relationship can vary across different times and cultures. In this elective students select a pair of texts and consider the ways in which human understanding of and relationship with the natural world is shaped and reflected”The two texts, Blade runner by Ridley Scott and Brave New World by

Radio Interview Script: Ridley Scott And Aldous Huxley Discussing The Significance Of "Blade Runner" And "Brave New World"

1114 words - 4 pages J: Today I'd like to discuss how context shapes the values reflected in texts, and to help me out, I've invited two gentlemen I believe to be experts on the matter. I'm sure the listeners are as excited as I am, so without further delay, allow me to introduce Aldous Huxley and Ridley Scott!H: Good morning.S: Hi John.J: Lets start with the basics Mr. Huxley. How do you believe your work was influenced by the context in which it was written.H: Oh