This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

To What Extent Did German Foreign Policy Become More Openly Nazi Rather Than Purely Nationalist In The Course Of 1938?

809 words - 3 pages

There are distinct differences between Nazi Foreign policy and the policy that a conservative nationalist government would have followed. I believe that up to 1938 Hitler was following a generally Nationalist foreign policy, then in 1938 there were key turning points, which led to his foreign policy becoming radically Nazi.Previous to 1938 German foreign policy was mainly based on aims of the Nationalists. It is important to remember the difference in aims between the Nationalists and the Nazis, the nationalists wanted to follow a specifically revisionist policy, reversing what had been placed upon them at the treaty of Versailles regaining land in Poland avoiding war with Britain and France and in the long run wanted to make Germany re-established as the dominant force in central Europe where as Hitler wanted to unite all German speakers and use Poland as a subservient ally against the USSR (originally) to in the long run become a dominant world power.Just before 1938 the Hossbach memorandum was clearly diverging from Conservative Nationalists policies as during the memorandum Hitler Identified his first targets to be Austria and Czechoslovakia, this is not what a Nationalist government would have wanted, there first territorial aim would have that which was lost in Poland through the treaty of Versailles. Also Hitler stated that Germany must prepare for a general European war with Britain France and the USSR, something that they specifically wanted to avoid. This is the first part of the turning point when German foreign policy becomes more openly Nazi.The next extremely Nazi step was the purge of the foreign office by Hitler, obviously something the conservative nationalist government would not ever have done. Hitler replaced Neurath with Ribbentrop as foreign minister, Neurath had been appointed before Hitler came to power (in 1932) and was a Conservative, so up until the purge Hitler had retained him. This is an important point in showing that in 1938 German foreign policy was becoming more openly Nazi also that before 1938 that the foreign policy was in fact largely Nationalist.A further part in the turning point was the Anschluss in 1938 which was one of Hitler's long standing aims set out in the party program in 1920 of uniting Austria with Germany. However this shows that the policy had not become any more Nazi than previous to 1938 because this was a long standing aim, however it...

Find Another Essay On To what Extent Did German Foreign Policy Become More Openly Nazi Rather than Purely Nationalist in the Course of 1938?

To what extent did anti-foreign sentiment contribute to the collapse of the Qing Dynasty?

2355 words - 10 pages of China. No longer were war junks a match for armed steamers and modern cannon.9 Furthermore, the rulers believed that the foreigners had no intention to take the Mandate of Heaven therefore did not present a fundanmental menace. It was assumed that the foreign powers would leave in the near future so the court allowed what became to be known as the treaty port system, granting concessions to foreigners to establish settlements, with their own

4. Why did so many Jews remain living in Nazi Germany (including Austria following the Anschluss of March 1938) up to the outbreak of the Second W

1718 words - 7 pages had even served for Germany during the First World War. The prospect of leaving family behind was too much to fathom for Jews, as some Jews were married to non-Jewish women, and considered themselves more German rather than Jewish. This essay will however focus on a variety of factors which include economic problems faced by Jews even before the Anschluss was introduced in 1938, immigration restrictions set out acutely for Jewish immigrants by

Philosophy: Reason vs. Revelation, Asses the extent to which faith is more valid if based on reason rather than revelation

762 words - 3 pages reason, people should turn to revelation. They should recognize that God is so utterly different from anything creaturely, that their only proper ground for talking about God lies in what God himself has said. This supports the idea that blind faith has more validity than reasoned faith.D.Z Phillips agreed with Barth's view and claimed that trying to justify belief in God by means of reason is misguided, as it doesn't engage with the true nature of

The German People did “Nazi” Hitler Coming

1338 words - 5 pages into contact with. While this is true during the final years of his reign, in the early years of his rise in the Nazi party, he could be quite charming and convincing. He gave numerous motivational speeches on how to fix Germany’s problems and make better lives for the German citizens. To a broken and unemployed people, promises of jobs and prosperity are welcome sounds. Not only did they like his promises, the German people could relate to him

Nazi Germany Foreign Policy

643 words - 3 pages The foreign policy of Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945 was different than any other country during that era. Their distinct approach to ruling came from the nation’s many diverse philosophies. Furthermore, every basis of motivation and control came from the beliefs in which they so strictly followed. Many aspects, such as, communism, fascism, and nationalism, influenced these ideologies. Unlike many other countries during this period, Nazi

To what extent did high culture become the tool of state interest during the period 1624-1715?

2233 words - 9 pages great power in Europe. Internally during this period the last forces of discord, social and religious, were crushed and in foreign policy these years mark her victory in the struggle with Spain and the Empire. In terms of high culture, Louis XIII remained a discreet monarch, seemingly disinclined to glorify his person or his power. Antoine Schnapper notes that, 'he [Louis] even gave up the venerable tradition of the ceremonial Royal Entries

To what extent was the Greek victory at Troy due to military tactics and technology, rather than military intelligence?

1520 words - 6 pages To what extent was the Greek victory at Troy due to military tactics and technology, rather than military intelligence?The Trojan War has been an epidemic for historians to express their viewpoints. It is the ultimate tale of love, war and deceit, the very morals that we hold so dearly to our heart. This story incorporates every ideology that we refer in our everyday of our lives. Military historians have used this tale not as a myth but as

"In Her Novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley Attempts To Shape The Values Of Her Society More Than She Attempts To Reflect Them." To What Extent Do You Agree?

1440 words - 6 pages Whilst making a critical judgement and shaping the values of society of her time, Mary Shelley uses her Gothic Romantic novel Frankenstein as a catalyst to reflect these values in more of a way than she attempts to shape them. Frankenstein is based around many features commonly found in the Gothic Romantic genre such as the pursuit of knowledge and the wonders of earth and creation. However, Shelley's work does not always directly mirror these

What role did the Nazi Party play in the revolutionising of German State and society between 1933 and 1939? With full Bibliography

2410 words - 10 pages , namely Hitler. Hitler and the Party were only interested in power and developing Germany in such a way that would make them an awesome war machine. They did not revolutionise the German state or German society. All they did was create an ideological image of the Nazi Party and made the people they was supposed to be nurturing and protecting suffer immeasurable mental and physical harm.Word Count 20200BibliographyAbel T, Why Hitler Came To Power

To what extent can Hitler and his foreign policy be blamed for the outbreak of World War two?

1293 words - 5 pages The outbreak of World War II on September 3rd 1939 occurred due to numerous factors. These causes include the harshness of the Treaty of Versailles, the failure of the League of Nations linked to the isolation of the US, appeasement introduced by the British Prime Minister in the year 1937 and the Nazi-Soviet Pact signed between Hitler and Stalin on the 28th of August 1938 . Hitler’s foreign policy had a huge impact on the outbreak of World

To what extent was Peter the Great's personality more of a disadvantage than an advantage in his attempts to reform Russia?

3247 words - 13 pages have proved more durable. Peter did have a choice between immediate war expenditures and investment outlays to provide the basis for large military resources. However, as Bogoslovskii points out ‘any delay in the fulfilment of his desires, even passing ones, put him beyond himself.’As P.N Miliukov suggests the consequences of Peter’s obsessive nature drove his economic policy to produce great results and bear the impression of

Similar Essays

What Was The German Foreign Policy From 1933 1938

986 words - 4 pages What Was The German Foreign Policy From 1933 ~ 1938 When Hitler came in to power of Germany in the early 1930's, he had many ambitions to make Germany a stronger and more independent country. Britain originally misunderstood Hitler's aims for Germany but it soon became apparent that he had higher ambitions than uniting German-speaking people, Independence and a reversal of the "˜Treaty of Versailles'. Hitler began to fulfil his

To What Extent Did Nazi Policy Result In A 'social Revoltuion' In The Lives Of Women?

1498 words - 6 pages The Nazi regime changed the lives of German's in many different ways. One of the most targeted groups within society were German women. However, it has long been debated whether a social revolution ever happened in German women's lives during the Nazi period, and if so, to what extent the Nazi regime revolutionised women's lives.The first view that historians put across is that there was a complete revolution in the lives of German women during

To What Extent Did Hitler Manipulate The German Population Into Following His Nazi Regime

1869 words - 7 pages To what extent did Hitler manipulate the German population into following his Nazi regime? From 1933-1945 Adolf Hitler rose to the peak of his political power, by creating a stronghold over the German people. The use of oratory skills, in conjunction with his knowledge and use of propaganda and his suppression of details of the Holocaust, created a vibe of “electric excitement” for Germany. (Fritzsche, 1998) His targeting of the German minority

To What Extent Did The Activities In Iran Prove Detrimental To Foreign Policy In The Reagan Administration?

1814 words - 7 pages A. Plan of Investigation This investigation assesses the Reagan Administration and its inconsistent foreign policy in regards to Iran. The Iran-Contra Affair was a controversial crisis for the fortieth president. It involved two parts: the selling of weapons to Iran and then the siphoning of that money to Nicaragua. However, in this investigation, the situation with Iran will be more prominently discussed, rather than the Nicaraguan situation