Tom Buchanan And George Wilson Caused The Death Of The Great Gatsby

692 words - 3 pages

In the 1920s novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Wilson shoots and kills Gatsby. But whos to blame? The man who pulled the trigger or other characters like Daisy, Myrtle, Tom or Gatsby himself, this leaves readers suspicious and curious with the question, who is the most responsible for Gatsby's death? Many characters throughout the novel have part with Gatsby’s death. The ending comes as a surprise to some readers which leaves the responsibility for Gatsby’s death unclear.

George Wilson who is married to Myrtle, and Tom Buchanan, married to Daisy, are most responsible for Gatsby's death. Wilson went up to Tom asking who owned the yellow car that killed his wife. Tom revealed that it was Gatsby’s car knowing that Wilson had intentions of killing whoever owned the car, yet Tom didn’t add in the fact that Daisy was driving. Gatsby did have a relationship with Daisy, and Tom knew about it. Tom allowed Daisy to go in Gatsby’s car back to West Egg to prove that he did not care if Daisy and Gatsby were together, had Tom not let Daisy go in Gatsby’s car, both Myrtle and Gatsby would be alive. Tom knew full well that Wilson was a threat to both him and Gatsby. Tom did nothing to stop Wilson from killing Gatsby because of his love for his wife and also the love he had for Myrtle, which makes him primarily responsible for Gatsby’s death. Also, Tom and Daisy leave town the day after Myrtle was killed, proving Tom’s knowledge that Daisy killed Myrtle.

To relieve the pain from the death of his wife, Wilson felt the need to kill Gatsby. He ultimately killed Gatsby and it is shown by “The chauffeur - he was one of Wolfsheim's protege's - heard the shots...” Wilson went into Gatsby’s pool area, he first shot Gatsby then shot himself. Wilson should have let justice take it’s course and have the police deal with the death of Myrtle. Due to Wilson pulling the trigger, he is the also primarily responsible...

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