Totalitarianism In Brave New World Essay

1847 words - 7 pages

The formative years of the 1900’s, suffered from communism, fascism, and capitalism. The author of the Brave New World, Mr. Aldous Huxley lived in a social order in which he had been exposed to all three of these systems. In the society of the Brave New World, which is set 600 years into the future, individuality is not condoned and the special motto “Community, Identity, Stability” frames the structure of the Totalitarian Government.
The Brave New World “community” is divided into five castes ranging from the Alphas, who are the most intellectually superior, and ending with the Epsilons who are the most intellectually inferior. “Identity” is portrayed in the “Conditioning Center,” where babies are not born but made then separated into the five classes. “Stability” in this society is insured through limitations placed on the intelligence of each group. The fundamental tenant behind the New World is “UTILITARIAN TOTALITARIANISM.” The goal of utilitarianism is to make the society happy as a whole and thus more efficient. A Totalitarian Government is kept in the New World by control, conditioning, and a lack of emotion and intelligence.
Through science people are not just created, they are conditioned to guarantee the happiness in humanity, “What man has joined nature, is powerless to put asunder,” shows how much conditioning can change behavior. In his writing, Huxley shows that misinformation starts at birth and can be used against us whenever we are unaware of it.
The New World is a blend of capitalism and communism. Capitalism seeks to stimulate trade market to generate a substantial amount of money, which results in economic benefits for the country. The system of rule in the Brave New World has a similar aspect. In it, the state plays an important role in the functioning of the country, and the trend towards the consumerism. There are no wastes in the New World. Everything is put to good use, even the dead. This belief that everything should be put to good use was an idea of Ford who created the T-model vehicle, which is also a major symbol in the Brave New World. In this world, people replace the sign of the cross with the “T” sign. By the time of the creation of this model, communities began to complain because cars were harmful to nature. Cleverly, Ford told the community that cars allow people to experience and love nature. Ford used nature as an incentive to buy a car. The Brave New World’s political system is similar to communism. In the communism system, leaders attempt to try and control everyone and their way of thinking.
The Brave New World portrays the perfect society, where citizens of “Utopia” live a life without depression, and any socioeconomic problems. In the New World, every portion of life is controlled. Only when a person is able to dig deeper inside of himself will he find that this world is nothing close to perfect. Drugs, sex, and mind games control this world and solve any problems that may arise, such as...

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