Trace Macbeth's Journey Throughout The Play Using The Themes Of Ambition, Equivoation And Free Will Versus Destiny.

840 words - 3 pages

The Shakespearean tragedy of "Macbeth" follows the journey of a man who was driven from his inner flaws and desires to his own destruction. Throughout this play there are many themes and ideals which are explored and exposed to the audience. The striking imagery established by Shakespeare's language in conjunction with the sequence of tragic events, has created a very chilling tale exploring various themes and their consequences. The first theme to be explored is the play is Equivocation. Shakespeare sadistically jests at the idea of equivocation and how a simple truth can lead to catastrophic death and destruction. The second theme is drive of ambition and power. Throughout the play there are many personal and military battles which are inevitably caused by ambition and a thirst for power. The final theme to be explored is the idea of free will versus destiny. It is debated whether the tragic events were caused by Macbeth's own personal flaws or if it was pre-destined by a higher force. The story of Macbeth is very rich with many intertwining layers. This essay will trace the journey of Macbeth while paying close consideration to the mentioned themes.Equivocation is the deliberate telling of a misleading truth. The idea of equivocation is first recognised in Act 1 Scene 3 where the witches tell their prophecies to Macbeth which sparks his inner ambition to become king. Banquo expresses his concern of the witches' prophecies in Act 1 Scene 3 "The instruments of darkness win us with honest trifles to betray in deepest consequence". The Porter in Act 2 Scene 3 jests in detail the outcomes of equivocation. Within the Porter's light humour, many significant details of Macbeth are mentioned for future reference. The witches have a second strike of equivocation when they show Macbeth the apparitions which assure him that he is safe. The apparitions explain that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth" and that he is safe until "Great Birnam Wood to high to Dunsinane" (Act 4 Scene 1). These apparitions make Macbeth over confident until his final destruction in Act 5. These misreadings play a vital role in the conclusion of Shakespeare's tragedy.The second theme, which is viewed as a catalyst of Macbeth's destruction, is ambition and power. Throughout the play there are many struggles for power. The beginning of the play describes the battle between the kingdom and an army of rebels. The...

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