Tradition In William Faulkner's A Rose For Emily And Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

640 words - 3 pages

Tradition in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily and Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

People throughout the world do things for many different reasons. Religion, peer pressure, or tradition are some of the reasons the people do things. In the U.S. we have many traditions such as Christmas. Some people have strange or out of the ordinary traditions. The two short stories ?The Lottery? and ?A Rose for Emily? both portray tradition.

     In ?The Lottery?, tradition is showed in three main ways. First, Old Man Warner says, ?there has always been a lottery (Jackson 11).? The town people accept The Lottery because there has always been a lottery. The older people in the town such as Old Man Warner keep the tradition alive with their ideals. Second, The Lottery is held every year. Tradition is upheld in this way because it introduces the younger generation to the tradition. This shows that the lottery is a tradition because traditions happen over and over again. Lastly, tradition is shown with the parifanilia used in the story of ?The Lottery?. The black box used to draw names is a duplicate of the original. The black box is a symbol of what was in the years past.

     In ?A Rose for Emily?, tradition is also shown in three main ways. First, Emily does not get courted by anyone. This would not seem to be a normal tradition but in the story her father did not want Emily to become involved with anyone. Emily?s father was not following tradition when doing this because normal tradition would be to allow Emily to become involved with someone. Second, ?A Rose for Emily? shows tradition in the way the townspeople treated Miss. Emily. Tradition is shown when the older generation of people put lime down instead of confronting Emily with the smell. The elders of the town also allowed Emily to go without paying taxes after she told them she did not have to pay them....

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