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Tragic Heroes Creon And Antigone

737 words - 3 pages

Who is the more of a tragic hero, Creon or Antigone? They both experienced much through out play, but Anitgone is clearly the “better” tragic hero. Antigone’s flaw, misfortune, and her fall from grace prove that she is much better than Creon as a tragic hero.

Antigone’s flaw is arrogance, and she shows it through out the story. She also “accepts that it is her flaw and she causes everything unlike Creon who believes it is the Gods that are causing his misfortune not his flaw. Antigone first sign of arrogance is in the beginning of the play where she and her sister, Ismene, are having a conflict about whether or not they should bury the brother. “Ismene: What! Bury him and flout the interdict? Antigone: “He is my brother still and yours […] I shall not abandon him. Ismene: What! Challenge Creon to his face? Antigone: He has no right to keep me from my own.” Ismene pleads Antigone not to bury the brother and face the consequences, but her arrogance stops her. Antigone also accepts her flaw that causes her misfortune. “Creon: Come girl […] Did you, or did you not, do this deed? Antigone: I did. I deny not a thing.” She agrees that she buried it, and continues on with the way her life should lead, but Creon implies that the god causes the misfortune, not the flaw. “Creon: Oh let it come! Let it break! My last and golden day: the best, the last, the worst to rob me of tomorrow” Creon pleads to the gods for the misfortune. Thus Antigone best fits Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero by blaming herself and not pleading to the gods for misfortune to end, as if the gods are causing it.

Antigone’s misfortune is the breaking of bonds between two sisters, to have lived a life without being married, and the death of her Fiancé. “Ismene: I did it too. If she’ll allow my claim. I share with her the credit and the blame. Antigone: That is not true. You do not share with me nor did I grant you partnership […] Ismene: Poor dear sister-let me suffer with you!” Even though her sister pleads to share the blame with...

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